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In Memoriam: Richard Geary
Monday, October 20, 2014

PORTLAND, Ore.—The staff and trustees of the Portland Art Museum mourn the passing of arts patron and philanthropist Richard “Dick” Geary. For decades, Dick—along with his wife, Museum Trustee Janet Geary—have been generous supporters of the Museum.
 
Janet and Dick have significantly supported the Museum’s major capital projects, allowing the Museum to grow; and special exhibitions, including Monet: Late Paintings of Giverny, Rembrandt and the Golden Age of Dutch Art, and Paris to Portland. Most recently they were the lead sponsors for the presentation of Venice: The Golden Age of Art and Music and led fundraising efforts to bring this international exhibition to Portland.
 
Janet and Dick have supported the acquisition of important works of art, bringing Marianne Loir’s Portrait of a Man Seated at a Desk (1750) and Thomas Blanchet’s Mercury and Herse (1650) into the permanent collection. They also support the Museum’s annual operations and programs through membership in the Chairman’s Circle.
 
In 2008, Janet and Dick endowed the Curator of European Art position, making it possible for the Museum to hire its first full-time curator for this important collection.
 
Dick’s deep appreciation of our mission, the role of the Museum within the community, and thoughtful counsel will be missed greatly.  This is as significant loss for our Museum and our City.
 
Services are scheduled for Friday, October 24 at 1:30 p.m. at the Lake Grove Presbyterian Church, 4040 Sunset Drive, Lake Oswego, Ore. A reception will follow at Oswego Lake Country Club, 20 Iron Mountain Boulevard, Lake Oswego, Ore.
 
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Portland Art Museum, Oregon Symphony, or OHSU Department of Neurology.

Bruce Guenther Announces Retirement
Monday, September 15, 2014

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Portland Art Museum today announced the retirement of Bruce Guenther, chief curator and The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

“It has been an honor to have worked with Bruce. As chief curator, he has played a critical role in helping define not only our modern and contemporary program, but also our larger curatorial vision and aspirations. His years of experience, knowledge, and deep commitment have left an indelible imprint upon our institution and community. Bruce will be missed," said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director.

During his 14-year tenure, Guenther led and grew the curatorial team to its current level of seven curators, including five endowed positions, presenting more than 20 exhibitions and dossier presentations each year. He was responsible for exhibition publications from concept through production. Guenther played a key role in the Museum’s last capital project, which resulted in the opening of the 28,000-square-foot Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art in 2005.

Guenther was responsible for the addition of more than 4,000 works to the permanent collections, including the acquisition of the Clement Greenberg Collection, 58 works from Eli and Edythe Broad, and 300 works from the estate of Los Angeles collector Judd Hammack, including works by Frank Auerbach, Sherrie Levine, Jasper Johns, and Brice Marden. Guenther also oversaw notable acquisitions, including The Ox Cart by Vincent van Gogh, Patrician Barnacle by Robert Rauschenberg, and Brushstrokes by Roy Lichtenstein.

Guenther curated dozens of special exhibitions, including major retrospectives and publications of significant Northwest artists Hilda Morris and Lee Kelly. He curated the 2012 retrospective of Mark Rothko and the contemporary survey Disquieted. He also collaborated on, and host curated, important international exhibitions including La Volupté du Goût: French Painting in the Age of Madame de Pompadour, The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece, and this summer’s The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden.

The 24 Contemporary Art Series exhibitions and a number of singular installations curated by Guenther have brought the most important contemporary artists from around the world to the Museum’s galleries, exposing our community to the work of Sophie Calle, Damien Hirst, Kehinde Wiley, Bruce Nauman, and Gerhard Richter. Guenther was instrumental in securing the Miller Meigs Endowment for the Contemporary Arts that funds the Museum’s exhibitions in that area. Of significant note was last year’s Masterworks/Portland presentation of Francis Bacon’s Three Studies of Lucian Freud. After it set auction records, nearly 100,000 visitors had the rare opportunity to see this important 20th-century work before it went into a private collection.

Prior to his joining the Portland Art Museum in 2000, Guenther’s career included curatorial positions at several noteworthy institutions. He was the curator of contemporary art at the Seattle Art Museum, chief curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and chief curator of the Orange County Museum of Art. A native Oregonian, Guenther began his professional career at the Portland Art Museum in the early 1970s as a National Endowment for the Arts curatorial intern.

He has organized exhibitions in Japan, South America, and Europe, as well as contributing essays to more than 80 publications.

Guenther’s last day will be October 20, following the anticipated opening of his latest exhibition, In Passionate Pursuit: The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Collection and Legacy.

The Museum will launch an international search for a chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art.

Click here to download the complete news release

Click here to download the Miller Meigs Series exhibition list, 2005-2014

Click here to download a photo of Bruce Guenther


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Announces the Finalists for 2015 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
Thursday, September 04, 2014

PORTLAND, Ore., Sept. 4, 2014 — Today the Portland Art Museum announced the finalists for the 2015 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards, an awards exhibition celebrating contemporary art created in the greater Northwest (Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana). The exhibition will open at the Museum in the fall of 2015.

The finalists are:

(Artist—City, State)

Gail Grinnell—Seattle, Washington

Jo Hamilton—Portland, Oregon

Annie Han & Daniel Mihalyo—Seattle, Washington

Victoria Haven—Seattle, Washington

Mary Iverson—Seattle, Washington

David Kroll—Vashon, Washington

Ellen Lesperance—Portland, Oregon

Margie Livingston—Seattle, Washington

Dana Lynn Louis—Portland, Oregon

Susan Moldenhauer—Laramie , Wyoming

Emily Nachison—Portland, Oregon

Ellen Ornitz—Manhattan, Montana

Helen O’Toole—Seattle, Washington

Ryan Pierce—Portland, Oregon

Jennifer Pulchinski—Bozeman, Montana

Wendy Red Star—Portland, Oregon

Vanessa Renwick—Portland, Oregon

Jay Schmidt—Bozeman, Montana

Shelby Shadwell—Laramie, Wyoming

Akio Takamori—Seattle, Washington

Phoebe Toland—Vaughn, Washington

Willem Volkersz—Bozeman, Montana

Samantha Wall—Portland, Oregon

Robert Yoder—Seattle, Washington

 

The Selection Process

Regional arts professionals, including curators, artists, dealer, artists, academics, and critics, were invited to nominate visual artists based on the quality of their work, innovation, relevance to community or global issues in the arts, continuity of vision, commitment to their practice, and level of development in their career. The Museum received more than 200 nominations and invited the nominated artist to submit application materials. Of the nominated artists, 192 submitted materials for review.

Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art, and guest curatorial advisor Jessica Hunter Larsen, Curator of Interdisciplinary Experimental Arts, Colorado College, reviewed the nominees’ materials and selected the 24 finalists.

Laing-Malcolmson will visit the artists’ studios during the next several months. Before the end of this year, she will present her recommendations to the Museum’s director and chief curator for the final review and the announcement of the four to seven award recipients. These artists will be featured in the 2015 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition opening in October 2015.

“There were exceptional submissions from each of 192 nominated artists, attesting to the strength and conceptual diversity of art in the Northwest region,” said Laing-Malcolmson. “Jessica and I spent many hours reviewing the outstanding entries and struggled to create a manageable list of finalists. I look forward to visiting each of the 24 artists in the near future to determine the award winners.”

 

About the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards

The program honors artistic merit and potential while providing an in-depth and scholarly presentation of work by promising contemporary artists living and working in the Northwest. The award recipients are honored with an exhibition in the Museum’s special exhibition galleries, a full-color catalogue, exhibition-related programming, and cash awards. One recipient will be further recognized with the Arlene Schnitzer Prize in the amount of $10,000. The finalists announced today will also be recognized in the catalogue.

The Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition, organized by the Portland Art Museum, is funded in part by The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowments for Northwest Art.

 

About The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowments for Northwest Art

The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowments for Northwest Art support the exhibition activities of the Center for Northwest Art, including the APEX series, related publications, the curatorial position, and acquisitions.

From the beginning, the Museum’s permanent collection has been shaped by the art and culture of the Northwest. The Schnitzer Center for Northwest Art brings the Museum’s regional collections to the forefront and celebrates a history of art making that extends from the late 19th century to the present in the five-state region of the Northwest.

The Center occupies the third and fourth floors of the Museum’s Hoffman Wing and presents the collection in rotation as well as APEX, an ongoing exhibition series dedicated to contemporary art of the region.

 

Learn about the artists featured in the 2013 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards.

Click here to download the complete news release


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden
Wednesday, June 11, 2014

PORTLAND, Ore.—Paris will come to the Park Blocks this summer with this stunning international exhibition celebrating the Tuileries Garden. Opening June 14 and on view through Sept. 21, 2014, The Art of the Tuileries Garden explores the art, design, and evolution of Paris’ most famous garden. It also celebrates garden designer André Le Nôtre (1613-1700)—best known for his grand perspectives and symmetry at the chateau gardens of Versailles.

Garden as History

The Tuileries, which stretches from the Louvre to the Place de la Concorde in central Paris, was originally created in 1564 in the Italian style and became the city’s first public park in 1667. Created at the behest of Queen Catherine de' Medici, the garden was designed to enhance the Tuileries Palace, which was eventually destroyed by fire in the 1871 civil uprising known as the Paris Commune.

Originally, the garden was reserved exclusively for royalty, but starting in the late 17th century, it became increasingly accessible to the public.

Garden as Art

Art has played a critical role in the history of the Tuileries Garden. Its beauty has inspired generations of artists, and it has also functioned as an outdoor museum, with works from the classical to the contemporary dotting its vast grounds.

The Art of the Louvre's Tuileries Garden will present more than 100 sculptures, paintings, photographs, and drawings by some of the most acclaimed European and American artists from the 17th to the 20th centuries, including works by Camille Pissaro, Édouard Manet, and others who have taken inspiration from the iconic Parisian landmark. Visitors will see monumental sculpture by Coysevox and Bosio for the first time in the United States.

The Camera in the Garden

The Tuileries Garden has been a part of the history of photography since the medium’s earliest days.

The exhibition features more than 50 rarely exhibited photographs, from a unique full-plate daguerreotype to modern interpretations of the Garden. Vintage French albumen prints document the aftermath of the Paris Commune and Tuileries Palace fire of 1871, while turn-of-the 20th-century views by Eugene Atget, a master photographer and chronicler of Paris’ changing environs, capture the elegant sculptures installed throughout the Garden. Additional works by renowned photographers Henri Cartier-Bresson and Michael Kenna suggest the peace, beauty, and mystery to be discovered in the heart of Paris.

Celebration of Portland Parks

The exhibition will be accompanied by a variety of lectures, conversations, tours, and events exploring the history and future of Portland’s public parks, gardens, and spaces. A complete list of programs is available at http://www.portlandartmuseum.org/tuileriesgarden.

In partnership with Portland Parks and Recreation and the Portland Parks Foundation, the Museum is asking people to share images of their favorite Portland parks on Instagram using the hashtag #captureparklandia. The final space in the exhibition includes a monitor showing these images of Portland’s public spaces along with map detailing the 200 parks in Portland.

An International Collaboration

This special exhibition is co-organized by the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, the Toledo Museum of Art, and the Portland Art Museum, with the exceptional collaboration of the Louvre and the generous participation of the Musée Carnavalet Histoire de Paris.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

Dates: June 14 – September 21, 2014

Host Curator: Bruce Guenther, Chief Curator and The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

Publication: The exhibition is accompanied by the hard-bound, full-color publication The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden, which is available in the Museum Shop ($50; $45 for members).

Admission
Timed for entry, includes general admission
Members / Children (17 and under): FREE
Adults: $20
Seniors (55 and older): $17
Students (18 and older with ID): $17

Hours
Monday: Closed
Tues – Wed: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thurs – Fri: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday: noon – 5 p.m.

Press materials, including high resolution images, are available at www.portlandartmuseum.org/press.

Click here to download the complete news release


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum to Present Richard Mosse’s The Enclave
Tuesday, June 03, 2014

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Portland Art Museum announced today that it will be the first U.S. museum to present Richard Mosse’s powerful video installation The Enclave (2013). The work, which premiered at the 2013 Venice Biennale in the Irish Pavilion, will open on November 8, 2014, and run through February 8, 2015. Several of his monumental photographs from the Democratic Republic of Congo will also be on display.

The Enclave was produced using a recently discontinued military film technology originally designed in World War II to reveal camouflaged installations hidden in the landscape. This film registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, rendering the green landscape in vivid hues of lavender, crimson, and hot pink. On the threshold of the medium’s extinction, Mosse employed this film to document an ongoing conflict situation in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. This humanitarian disaster—in which 5.4 million people have died since 1998—is largely overlooked by the mass media. Frequent massacres, human rights violations, and widespread sexual violence remain unaccounted for. In a kind of advocacy of seeing, The Enclave attempts to cast this forgotten tragedy in a new spectrum of light, to make this forgotten humanitarian disaster visible.

The Enclave comprises six monumental double-sided screens installed in a large darkened chamber, creating a physically immersive experience. This disorienting and kaleidoscopic installation is intended to formally parallel eastern Congo’s multifaceted conflict, confounding expectations and forcing the viewer to interact spatially from an array of differing viewpoints. Its haunting, visceral soundscape is layered spatially by 12-point surround sound, composed by Ben Frost from recordings gathered in North and South Kivu. The piece took more than a year to produce. It is a looping, non-linear narrative which documents civilians fleeing massacre and Mai Mai militia preparing for battle, as well as M23 rebels moving on, fighting for, and finally taking the city of Goma. This humanitarian disaster unfolds in a landscape of extraordinary beauty, on the shores of Lake Kivu.

“Richard’s ability to use the sublime in his art to engage the viewer is impressive. With this approach, one is captivated and then forced to contemplate the complex humanitarian issues occurring on a daily basis in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director.

Mosse was born in Ireland in 1980 and currently lives and works in New York. He earned an MFA in photography from Yale School of Art and a postgraduate diploma in fine art from Goldsmiths in London. In 2014, Mosse was awarded the prestigious Deutsche Börse Photography Prize, and in 2011 received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Foreign Policy Magazine listed him as a Leading Global Thinker of 2013.

The Enclave is organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director, and Julia Dolan, Ph.D., The Minor White Curator of Photography.

The Enclave is generously supported by Jasmin and Matthew Felton, Katherine and James Gentry, Lisa Domenico Brooke, Linda Rae Hickey, Kathleen Lewis Linda and Steven McGeady , The Arnold and Augusta Newman Foundation, The Lazar Foundation , Gun Denhart, Rosine and Colin Evans, and Margaret and Roger Hinshaw.

High resolution images are available at http://www.portlandartmuseum.org/press

Watch this video to learn more about the making of The Enclave.

Click here to download the complete news release


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Acquires Important Collection of Robert Adams Photographs
Tuesday, May 27, 2014

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Portland Art Museum announces the acquisition of 69 photographs of Western Oregon by renowned landscape photographer Robert Adams. This is the largest single acquisition of photographs by a living artist of Adams’ stature in the Museum’s history.

The photographs, taken between 1992 and 2012, explore the impact of clear-cutting in Oregon’s Coast Range and the hope of recovery found at the edge of the Pacific Ocean.

“The photographs that Adams makes in clear-cut spaces are raw and brutal, suggestive of a crime scene,” said Julia Dolan, Ph.D., The Minor White Curator of Photography. The images of the Oregon Coast capture the constant and forgiving beauty of nature.”

The photographs were featured in the Museum’s recent exhibition The Question of Hope: Robert Adams in Western Oregon and in a publication of the same name.

“No photographer of our time has better shown us what we both love and too often tend to spoil throughout the American West than Robert Adams.  Some years ago the Yale University Art Gallery was privileged to acquire the master sets of most of Adams’ photographic projects, believing them to comprise the finest overall body of visual literature created and published in America during the last 50 years. Our teaching museum, which has also organized Adams’ currently touring retrospective, now heartily cheers the Portland Art Museum for purchasing an outstanding selection of Adams’ photographs to add to its distinguished holdings,” said Jock Reynolds, The Henry J. Heinz II Director of the Yale University Art Gallery. “I know that Robert and Kerstin Adams are personally very grateful that this particular body of imagery, which was created in the state where they dwell, can now be perpetually studied and exhibited for the benefit of all Oregonians, helping to stir more discussions as to how the their treasured natural resources might be better treated both now and for generations to come.”

The acquisition was made possible through the generosity of Museum patrons Bonnie Serkin and Will Emery, several anonymous benefactors, and a grant from the Oregon Arts Commission.

“I am most grateful to our generous donors for making this acquisition possible. Their gifts will serve this community for generations,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director of the Portland Art Museum.

Robert Adams was among the first to reconsider the photographic presentation of the post-World War II American West. His detailed style and inquisitive approach redefined the genre and continue to influence photographers around the world. A visitor to the Oregon Coast since the early 1960s, Adams has lived in Astoria, Ore., with his wife, Kerstin, since 1997, and the region’s terrain remains his primary subject. The Museum’s acquisition of these photographs will preserve this powerful work created by one of the country’s most important photographers.

“The acquisition of these significant works of art by one of America’s foremost photographers, Robert Adams, is a major event in our institution’s history and one that will help shape and define our future,” said Dolan.

This acquisition continues the Museum’s commitment to collecting and presenting photographic arts. The Museum embraced photography as early as the turn of the 20th century, when Edward Sheriff Curtis’ monumental 20-book publication The North American Indian was donated to the Museum Library. A significant number of the more than 2,000 photographs contained in the series featured Native American tribes of the Northwest. Minor White, who went on to become one of the most influential photographers and teachers of the 20th century, made his first photographs in Portland for the Works Progress Administration during the late 1930s. The federal government placed more than 100 of these rare photographs with the Museum in the 1940s. Like these earlier groups, Adams’ photographs of Oregon’s coastline and forests distinguish the Museum’s collection with exceptional work created in the region, making the Museum one of the few institutions in the world to possess this rare and geographically meaningful body of photographs.

Click here to download the complete news release


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Shine a Light 2014
Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Rethink What Can Happen in an Art Museum — June 6, 6 p.m. to midnight

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Portland Art Museum’s popular Shine a Light event returns on June 6. A collaboration with Portland State University’s Art and Social Practice MFA Program, the event features a mix of artist-driven installations, performance, and interventions throughout the Museum campus, offering an exciting opportunity for visitors to rethink their relationships to art and experiences inside a museum.

Projects for this year’s event include:

Karaoking the Museum uses the form of popular songs to tell the material and social history of art through the participatory form of karaoke. Popular songs have been paired with artworks in the Museum and have had their lyrics altered to reveal the context in which the artworks were made. Visitors will sing and compete for prizes for best performance.

Talking About Museums in Public, which brings together a group of Portland artists to encourage public conversation and thinking about the role of museums in people’s lives in the 21st century. Projects will take place in the month of June throughout the city and at the Portland Art Museum. At Shine a Light, visitors can engage in discussion with the participating artists.

For 33 1/3, three local DJ’s and music lovers have been invited to respond to the Museum with the creation of 90-minute site-specific sets. These sets will range from musical responses to the collection to soundscapes that will envelop galleries and provoke contemplation and connections.

Psychic Landscape of the Art Museum will invite Museum visitors to have their cards read by an eighth-generation tarot reader, using a custom deck based on artworks in the Museum. Each card spread will serve as the participant's personalized map of the Museum. Each participant will receive both a map and a copy of the tarot deck. The project encourages Museum visitors to form new and unique relationships between art and their own lives.

Live Lounge Underground will invite visitors to enjoy sultry live sounds in the Stevens Room Radio Lounge. During a live radio hour, audience members are invited to participate in activities that shape the content of the broadcast and to share stories on air. Come listen, watch, and participate as we re-imagine live radio production with a live band!

A History of Engagement: The Portland Art Museum (1892-2014) highlights amazing moments of connection, big and small, that have taken place at this institution since its founding in 1892.The timeline focuses on engagement that moves outside of standard practice, reaches beyond the Museum walls to build relationships, fosters community participation, and makes clear that a museum can be a center of not only cultural engagement, but civic, social, and community activity.

Healing the Museum creates a platform for sound healers to address oppressive historical narratives through participatory healing rituals.

Over the T.O.P. (Terms of Participation) asks: “How do we involve others in our projects and not take advantage of them?” And “How do we provide ethical compensation to the people responsible for co-creating our works?” So join us in this conversation and for a chance to win some money in a bout of arm wrestling.

Art for Education works with several artists currently on display in the Museum’s Northwest and Native American galleries to extract problems from their artworks, turning them into prompts for the public. Through art-making in an eight-week workshop, sixth graders at the King School in Northeast Portland solved the same problems. Their experience is then made public through an audio tour and artist talks. The project also invites the museum public to give alternate solutions to the same problems during Shine a Light.

The Box Project celebrates acts of creativity that usually take place in the home by temporarily moving them into the museum. During the day of Shine a Light, project participants alter cardboard boxes for their young children as they would at home. Later in the night, participants reclaim play and alter boxes for themselves. Together, all participants build a parallel museum within the museum out of their creations. Boxes are all reused cardboard donated by local businesses and will be recycled at the end of the workshop. The project, documented via www.picturesofboxes.tumblr.com, raises questions about learning and play, creativity and parenting.

Radical Acceptance is a project that appropriates Cognitive and Dialectical Behavior Therapy skills to create a platform for visitors to engage and relate to the Museum and its collections in a new way. Harnessing the shared benefits of both art and therapy through a guided audio tour, the project offers an emotional and therapeutic experience of the museum in exchange for the visitor’s own psycho-social investment.

Twelve book publishers, sellers and authors will participate in A Book Fair at the Museum. Students from PSU's sculpture and architecture programs designed and built sculptural display units. The book fair display units will be dispersed in galleries throughout the Museum. Each organization will have a representative with their display to talk with the public and sell books.

First Impressions will gather two groups of Portland residents who have never visited the Museum. Armed with mobile devices, they will document aspects of the Museum that seem relevant to their initial experience. These images and videos will be displayed in the lobby of the Museum and online to explore public ideas about the Museum and the role of the amateur in curated space.

Movement Scores for the Museum is an interactive performance that draws upon various narratives of how gallery experiences are shaped by the movements of docents, guards, art handlers, and museum visitors. Developed over time through observation, conversation and movement research, a collection of prompts and scores will be interpreted and performed by a porous ensemble of dancers, artists and non-dancers (including Museum staff and visitors).

Art & Beer is a program that invites local breweries to make beer inspired by artwork from the Museum’s collection. Breweries made beer inspired by the The Drunken Cobbler, an 18th-century painting by Jean Baptiste Greuze. The painting is on view in the European galleries and is one of the most noted paintings in the Museum’s collection. The five beers will debut at Shine a Light.

In 1891, a Sketch Club was founded by several Portland men and women, which led to the eventual formation of what is now the Portland Art Museum. In 1924, a Masonic Temple was built next door. For more than 60 years, this Temple was a place of Masonic rituals and events until its purchase by the Museum in the 1990s. In an attempt to highlight and meld these interesting historical aspects of the Museum, Order of the Free Association (OFA) will create a secret society Sketch Club will be formed and perform free drawing rituals for those selected.

Complete details of the projects, including artist biographies, are available at portlandartmuseum.org/shinealight. Admission: $5 Museum members; $15 general admission; Free for children 17 and under; Free for College Pass holders; $5 for college students (without a college pass).

Shine a Light Sponsors: The Young Patrons of the Portland Art Museum and The Education Committee of the Portland Art Museum.

Education Sponsors: Key Bank Ray Hickey Foundation, Wes and Nancy Lematta Fund of the OCF, The Lamb Baldwin Foundation, and William H. and Mary L. Bauman Foundation.

Media Partner: Portland Mercury.

Take a look at last year’s event: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGweG5gUxi8.

Click here to download the complete news release

Click here to download the Shine a Light 2014 Catalogue


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Art-Inspired Beer at the Portland Art Museum
Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Eighteenth-Century Painting Taps Creativity of Local Brewers

PORTLAND, Ore. — Art & Beer (#artandbeer) returns to the Portland Art Museum. This program, created by Portland artist Eric Steen, invites local breweries to make beer inspired by a work in the Museum’s permanent collection. On June 13, the Museum and Widmer Brothers will host an event where visitors will taste the art-inspired beer.

Five Portland breweries have conducted multiple visits to the Museum to view and learn more about The Drunken Cobbler, an 18th-century painting by French artist Jean-Baptiste Greuze in the Museum’s European art collection.

The participating breweries are Widmer Brothers Brewing, Breakside Brewery, Ecliptic Brewing, Humble Brewing, and Laurelwood Brewing.

At the June 13 event, guests will learn about the painting, the conservation of art, the process of creating the beers, and the parallels between the science of preserving art and the brewing process.

Event tickets include half-pint samples of each beer, commemorative glassware, light snacks, and Museum general admission. Advance tickets are available online at portlandartmuseum.org.

ART & BEER: THE DRUNKEN COBBLER
June 13, 6 p.m. (doors open at 5:30)
Portland Art Museum, Kridel Grand Ballroom
1119 SW Park Avenue
$10 Museum members; $12 non-members

Art and Beer is generously sponsored by Widmer Brothers Brewing and both the Museum’s Young Patron Society and the education committee.

About the Painting
Jean-Baptiste Greuze’s The Drunken Cobbler, painted in the early 1780s, represents a departure from the idealized and aristocratic subject matter favored by the French Academy—of which he was a member. In this painting, Greuze references the adage that it is always the cobbler’s children who have no shoes, while warning the viewer of the dangers of overindulgence.

About the Portland Art Museum
The seventh oldest museum in the United States, the Portland Art Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 50,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of arts of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its galleries to its permanent collection. The Museum’s campus of landmark buildings, a cornerstone of Portland’s cultural district, includes the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art, the Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts, the Schnitzer Center for Northwest Art, the Northwest Film Center, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Center for Native American Art. With a membership of more than 22,000 households and serving more than 350,000 visitors annually, the Museum is a premier venue for education in the visual arts. For information on exhibitions and programs, call 503-226-2811 or visit portlandartmuseum.org

About Widmer Brothers Brewing
Founded in 1984, Widmer Brothers Brewing is celebrating 30 years of beer in 2014. Founders Kurt and Rob Widmer helped lead the Pacific Northwest craft beer movement in 1984 when, in their 20s, they began brewing unique interpretations of traditional German beer styles. In 1986, Widmer Brothers Brewing introduced the original American-style Hefeweizen, which elevated the brewery to national acclaim. Since then, the brewery has continued to push the boundaries of craft beer, developing a variety of beers with an unapologetic, uncompromised commitment to innovation.

About Eric Steen
Steen is an artist, event planner, and award-winning teacher. His work includes themes of place-based and interdisciplinary learning, outdoor education, food, and beverage. Eric is the founder of Beers Made by Walking and Focus on the Beer. He has worked with breweries across the country on innovative beer programming. He has built events for Performa, Food Bank Fair (NY), Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art (UK), Denver Beer Week during the Great American Beer Festival (CO), Portland Art Museum, PDX Beer Week (OR), Charlotte Street Foundation (MO), and more. He has been featured in NPR, OPB, Outside Magazine, Portland Outsider, Heritage Radio Network, Christian Science Monitor, All About Beer, and Draft Magazine. He can be contacted at ericsteen@gmail.com

Click here to download the complete news release.


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum and Seattle Art Museum Present Major Exhibition of Masterpieces Drawn from the Paul G. Allen Family Collection
Wednesday, April 23, 2014

April 23, 2014 – Seattle, WA and Portland, OR – The Seattle Art Museum and the Portland Art Museum today announced a major exhibition exploring the evolution of European and American landscape painting. Seeing Nature: Landscape Masterworks from the Paul G. Allen Family Collection will feature some 40 paintings from five centuries of masterpieces drawn from the collection of Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul G. Allen.

“This is a rare opportunity for the public to see these landscape masterpieces from Paul Allen’s extraordinary collection,” said Kimerly Rorschach, the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Director and CEO of the Seattle Art Museum. “It is especially meaningful here in Mr. Allen’s hometown of Seattle where his generous support of the arts has made a significant impact.”

The exhibition – which is being co-organized by the Seattle Art Museum, the Portland Art Museum and the Paul G. Allen Family Collection – will premiere at the Portland Art Museum in October 2015 and will conclude in Seattle in early 2017 at the Seattle Art Museum. The exhibition will also travel to The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the New Orleans Museum of Art.

“Paul Allen is one of the Northwest’s most significant art collectors and philanthropists,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director of the Portland Art Museum. “His willingness to share his landscape masterpieces with our visitors continues his exceptional generosity and is a wonderful opportunity to be inspired by works of art that reflect his personal vision.”

Seeing Nature explores the development of landscape painting from a small window on the world to expressions of artists’ experiences with their surroundings on land and sea. The exhibition begins with Jan Brueghel the Younger’s allegorical series of the five senses. These exquisite, highly detailed paintings provide a platform for visitors to explore the exhibition by considering their own experience with the world through sight, touch, smell, sound and taste.

The next section of the exhibition demonstrates the power of landscape to locate the viewer in time and place—to record, explore, and understand the natural and man-made world. Artists began to interpret the specifics of a picturesque city, a parcel of land, or dramatic natural phenomena. Venice, one of Paul Allen’s favorite cities, also attracted many artists from outside Italy; his collection features a stunning group of evocative Venetian scenes by Canaletto, Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, and J.M.W. Turner, among others.

In the 19th century, the early Impressionists focused on direct observation of nature. The Allen collection is particularly strong in the works of Monet, who embodied this practice, drawing Paul Cézanne’s famous comment, “Monet is only an eye, but my God, what an eye.” Five great Monet landscapes spanning thirty years are featured, from views of the French countryside to one of his late immersive representations of water lilies, Le Bassin aux Nymphéas of 1919. Cézanne himself and fellow Post-Impressionists such as Vincent van Gogh used a more frankly subjective approach to create works such as La Montagne Sainte- Victoire (1888-90) and Orchard with Peach Trees in Blossom (1888). The exhibition also features a rare landscape masterpiece by the Austrian painter Gustav Klimt, Birch Forest of 1903.

“The Allen collection invites viewers to think about landscape and our place in the world through the eyes of great artists. One may focus on a familiar setting and help us see the special qualities of our everyday surroundings, while another is captivated by the overwhelming grandeur of an extraordinary site like the Grand Canyon,” says Chiyo Ishikawa, Susan Brotman Deputy Director for Art and Curator of European Painting and Sculpture at the Seattle Art Museum.

The last part of the exhibition explores the paintings of European and American artists working in the complexity of the 20th century. In highly individualized ways, artists as diverse as Georgia O’Keeffe, Edward Hopper, David Hockney, Gerhard Richter, and Ed Ruscha bring fresh perspectives to traditional landscape subjects.

“The final section of the exhibition exposes the diversity of artists’ use of the landscape genre from psychological dreamscape to the basis of formal theoretical trope,” said Bruce Guenther, Chief Curator and the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Portland Art Museum, and the curator of the exhibition.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color, hard-bound publication documenting the featured works with essays by Chiyo Ishikawa and Bruce Guenther, and descriptions of all the works by the curatorial staffs of both museums.

Seeing Nature: Landscape Masterworks from the Paul G. Allen Family Collection is coorganized by Portland Art Museum, Seattle Art Museum and the Paul G. Allen Family Collection.

About the Seattle Art Museum

The Seattle Art Museum provides a welcoming place for people to connect with art and to consider its relationship to their lives. SAM is one museum in three locations: the Seattle Art Museum in downtown Seattle, the Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park, and the Olympic Sculpture Park on the downtown waterfront. SAM collects, preserves, and exhibits objects from across time and across cultures, exploring the dynamic connections between past and present. For more than eight decades, the Seattle Art Museum has been one of the Pacific Northwest’s leading visual arts institutions. The collections of the Seattle Art Museum number approximately 25,000 objects and are distinguished in the areas of African art, American art, Ancient Mediterranean and Islamic art, Asian art, decorative arts, European art, modern and contemporary art, Native and Meso-American art, and Oceanic and Aboriginal art. The museum has a membership of more than 35,000 households and serves more than 750,000 visitors annually at its three sites. For more information, call 206-654- 3100 or visitsam.org.

About the Portland Art Museum

The seventh oldest museum in the United States, the Portland Art Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 45,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of arts of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its galleries to its permanent collection. The Museum’s campus of landmark buildings, a cornerstone of Portland’s cultural district, includes the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art, the Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts, the Schnitzer Center for Northwest Art, the Northwest Film Center, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Center for Native American Art. With a membership of more than 22,000 households and serving more than 350,000 visitors annually, the Museum is a premier venue for education in the visual arts. For information on exhibitions and programs, call 503-226-2811 or visit portlandartmuseum.org

About Paul G. Allen

Paul G. Allen is a leading investor, entrepreneur and philanthropist who has given more than $1.5 billion to charitable causes over his lifetime. He founded Vulcan Inc. in 1986 with Jody Allen to oversee his business and philanthropic activities. Today, that Seattle-based company oversees a wide range of Allen’s investments and projects throughout the world. In 2003, he created the Allen Institute for Brain Science to accelerate understanding of the human brain in health and disease and, a decade later, launched the expansion of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence to explore opportunities for development in the field of AI. He is the cofounder of The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, which has awarded more than $494 million to nonprofits in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. For more information, go to www.pgafamilyfoundation.org and www.vulcan.com.

Press materials, including high resolution images, are available at portlandartmuseum.org/press

Click here to download the complete news release.

 


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Venice: The Golden Age of Art and Music
Wednesday, February 12, 2014

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Portland Art Museum is the only U.S. venue for Venice: The Golden Age of Art and Music, opening on February 15. This stunning exhibition explores the heroic age of art and music in the Republic of Venice, also referred to as La Serenissima or “the most serene.”

Between the early 16th century and the fall of the Venetian Republic at the close of the 18th century, the great flourishing of the arts included innovative painters such as Tintoretto, Tiepolo, Canaletto, and Guardi, as well as composers Willaert, Gabrieli, Monteverdi, and Vivaldi who created some of the most beautiful music of the era. This spectacular international loan exhibition explores the important interrelationships of the visual arts and music in the city’s elaborate civic ceremonies, festivals, and culture.

The great artists working in Venice not only reveled in depicting the city’s processions, concerts, and dance, but many were accomplished musicians themselves. Composers depended on artists for set designs and costumes, and the dramatic stories of popular operas were embraced as subjects by painters and sculptors.

This multidisciplinary exhibition, organized by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, is the first to explore the interaction between the visual arts, music, and political culture in Venice and will include paintings, prints, drawings, illuminated manuscripts, and sculptures along with original period instruments and early music texts. Period music will be playing in the galleries enhancing the visitor’s experience.

The exhibition includes 108 objects from 48 lenders in Europe and North America. It is organized and installed in the following thematic sections:

Basilica of San Marco
The exhibition opens with an exploration of the Basilica of San Marco, which symbolized Venetian wealth, power, and piety. The church and the state were closely linked in Venice, with the Doge’s chapel at San Marco as the center of religious devotion. This section reflects the rich musical tradition of the cathedral.

Civic Pageantry
The Venetian Republic cultivated rituals as an important agent of statecraft. This section explores the splendid festivities and processions staged throughout the year, demonstrating the Republic’s grandeur, dignity, and piety to city inhabitants and visitors. Most notable was the drama of the Doge (chief magistrate) of Venice on the great state galley, the Bucintoro, being rowed out to wed the sea on Ascension Day. A vast flotilla of Venetians would accompany the Bucintoro. This event was a popular subject of painters including Canaletto.

The Scuole and The Ospedali
The exhibition presents the impact of the scuole (schools) and ospedali (hospital orphanages) on art and music in the city. These two types of charitable institutions made art and music integral to their primary missions to address religious and social needs.

Musicians and Concerts
This section looks at the impact and importance of music in Venice—from merchant class to patrician families. Ownership of musical instruments was considered essential to life. Venice was an important center for music publishers, and the city was famous for instrument makers producing instruments distinguished by extraordinary sound and beauty.

Popular Music
Popular music resounded through not only the opera theaters and taverns of Venice, but also the streets and waterways where gondoliers, street charlatans, and courtesans performed. The influence of commedia dell’arte and Carnival in providing music-filled activities in the city is explored in this section.

Mythology and Opera
Although born in Florence, opera flourished in Venice with resident composers and a host of opera venues. Music-loving tourists flocked to Venice from throughout Europe to see the latest works in the first successful commercial opera houses on the continent. Greek and Roman mythologies were popular subjects for both opera and paintings.

The Museum has produced a mobile audio guide of the exhibition and music of the age, which can be accessed starting February 15 at portlandartmuseum.org/digitaltours

The guide features Dawson Carr, Ph.D., The Janet and Richard Geary Curator of European Art; Marc Vanscheeuwijck, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music History, University of Oregon; Faun Tanenbaum Tiedge, Ph.D., Department Chair and Professor of Music, Linfield College; Byron Will, local harpsichord and clavichord builder; Brandon Labadie, Julliard-trained oboist, Portland Baroque Orchestra; Chris Mattaliano, Director, Portland Opera; and more.

The exhibition is accompanied by a full-color publication available in the Museum Shop. An exciting variety of programs will accompany the run of the exhibition, including concerts, lectures, and a workshop on the art of building Italian Baroque musical instruments.

The Museum is collaborating with Cappella Romana, Portland Baroque Orchestra, musicians from the Oregon Symphony, Allora Baroque Ensemble, Arnica Quartet, and others on live musical presentations during the exhibition. Information on all programs is available at portlandartmuseum.org/venice.

Organized by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts under the direction of Nathalie Bondil, curated by Hilliard T. Goldfarb, Associate Chief Curator and Curator of Old Masters; host curated by Dawson Carr, Ph.D., The Janet and Richard Geary Curator of European Art, Portland Art Museum.

Press materials, including high resolution images, are available at portlandartmuseum.org/press

Click here to download the complete news release.

 


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Fine Print Fair, January 31-February 2, 2014
Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Beginning on January 31, 2014, the Art Councils of the Portland Art Museum will host the Portland Fine Print Fair in the historic Fields Ballroom (1119 SW Park Avenue, Portland, Ore.). In this inaugural year, 21 of the top dealers from across North America will exhibit their finest prints, including Old Master etchings and engravings, Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints, and work by modern and contemporary artists. Nearly all periods and methods of printmaking will be on display. This fair will be a rare opportunity to have access to such a diverse range of original fine art prints and to the highly knowledgeable dealers who carry them.

"The Portland Art Museum is the home of the Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts, the premier Museum print collection in the Pacific Northwest," said Bruce Guenther, chief curator and The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Museum. "With holdings of more than 26,000 prints, drawings, and photographs ranging from the Old Masters to contemporary artists, the collection is an invaluable resource for scholars, artists, collectors and visitors. It is only fitting that we host the Portland Fine Print Fair as a sign of our long-held commitment to the graphic arts, and to encourage private collecting."

Curator-led tours will be held on Saturday, allowing the public to learn about printmaking, the latest research, and current trends. The Portland Fine Print Fair coincides with the exhibition Feast and Famine: the Pleasures and Politics of Food, a look at food as seen in graphic art drawn from the Museum collection and important private holdings.

"We are delighted that our public will have the opportunity to browse and buy Museum-quality prints during the fair," said Mary Weaver Chapin, curator of graphic arts. "Prints have always been important to the Museum and to this community, and we look forward to this festive and educational event."

The Fair will kick off with a benefit preview and reception on Friday from 6 to 9 p.m., as guests have the first look at the fine prints available and enjoy hors d'oeuvres and wine. Tickets are $25 in advance, $35 at the door—with proceeds going to the acquisition fund of the Museum. Admission is free on Saturday and Sunday.

The Portland Fine Print Fair is sponsored by the Art Councils of the Portland Art Museum. Councils bring together Museum members who share an interest in art, culture, and scholarship, and offer behind-the-scenes access to collections, exhibitions, and curators at the Museum. Learn more about the opportunities offered by council membership at www.portlandartmuseum.org/councils.


Portland Fine Print Fair 2014
January 31–February 2, 2014

Fields Ballroom, Mark Building
1119 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR


Benefit Preview and Reception
January 31, 6–9 p.m.
Come see what is available before the fair opens to the public, and enjoy hors d’oeuvres and wine as you shop. The evening benefits the Museum’s acquisition fund.

Tickets $25 in advance, $35 night of the event. Tickets are available online at portlandartmuseum.org

Portland Fine Print Fair
February 1, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.
February 2, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Come view the finest prints from 21 of the top dealers from across North America.

Free admission.



Exhibitors

 The Annex Galleries
 Santa Rosa, CA
 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century American and European fine prints

 Armstrong Fine Art
 Chicago, IL
 19th- to 21st-century French prints and drawings

 The Art of Japan
 Medina, WA
 Fine Japanese prints

 Augen Gallery
 Portland, OR
 Contemporary master prints and Northwest Artists

 Azuma Gallery
 Seattle, WA
 Traditional and contemporary Japanese fine art

 Catherine E. Burns Fine Prints & Drawings
Oakland, CA
 19th- and early 20th-century original prints and drawings by European and American artists

 Conrad R. Graeber Fine Art
 Riderwood, MD
 American, European, and Japanese prints and drawings

 Cullom Gallery
 Seattle, WA
 Historic and contemporary works on paper by Japanese, American, and European artists

Crow's Shadow Press
Pendleton, OR
Publishers of Native American and international prints

 Davidson Galleries
 Seattle, WA
 Contemporary and antique prints from Europe, Asia, and the Americas

 Greg Kucera Gallery, Inc.
 Seattle, WA
 Contemporary American prints, artists of the Northwest

 Jan Johnson Old Master & Modern Prints, Inc.
 Chambly, Quebec, Canada
 Old Master prints, 19th- and early 20th-century European and Canadian prints


 Joel R. Bergquist Fine Arts
 Stanford, CA
 17th- to 20th-century European and American prints and drawings

 kleinprint
 Van Nuys, CA
 Contemporary works of art on paper from Central and Eastern Europe

 Warnock Fine Arts
 Palm Springs, CA
 Contemporary American, European, and Chicano prints

 M. Lee Stone Fine Prints, Inc.
 San Jose, CA
 Prints and drawings by American masters

 R.E. Lewis & Daughter Original Prints
San Rafael, CA
Old Master prints, Modern prints, and German Expressionists

 Susan Teller Gallery
 New York, NY
 American works on paper, 1920s-50s including the Urban/Industrial Scene, Surrealism, and Modernism

 The Tolman Collection
 Tokyo, Japan
 Contemporary Japanese prints

 William P. Carl Fine Prints
 Durham, NC
 Prints from 1850 to 1950, emphasizing color woodcuts

 Worthington Gallery
 Chicago, IL
 German Expressionism, Blauer Reiter, modern and contemporary German and American masters

Click here to download the news release (PDF)

 

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For more information, please contact:

Beth Heinrich
Director of Public Relations
503-276-4370

 


Masterworks / Portland: Francis Bacon opens December 21, 2013
Monday, December 16, 2013

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Portland Art Museum continues the Masterworks / Portland series with the presentation of Three Studies of Lucian Freud by Francis Bacon, on view December 21, 2013 - March 30, 2014.

“For some time Chief Curator Bruce Guenther and I have been looking for a modern or contemporary work to present in this ongoing series that brings singular masterpieces to Portland,” explained Museum Director Brian Ferriso. “When the collector agreed to our request to exhibit the triptych, we knew that it would be an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for our visitors to see this seminal work.”

Among the most significant figurative painters of the 20th century, Bacon (British, 1909-1992) gave form to the emotional and psychological landscape of the modern era. Both acclaimed and reviled during his lifetime, the Dublin-born Bacon touched the raw nerve of the post-war era in his art-historically referenced paintings and existentially wrought portraits.

Three Studies of Lucian Freud (1969) is considered to be among his finest portraits for its aesthetic resolution and insightful rendering of fellow artist Lucian Freud, the grandson of Sigmund Freud.

Bacon and Freud were close friends and regular companions in post-war London. Their friendship provided an aesthetic sounding board for their exploration of figural expressionism—painting each other on numerous occasions for more than 50 years. Bacon completed more than a dozen different portraits of Freud. Three Studies of Lucian Freud is considered an emotional and painterly summation of their friendship.

Bacon’s monumental triptych positions the subject inside a crystalline frame that defines an emotional as well as architectural space. Each panel shows a different viewpoint—left, front, and right.

“Bacon captures the spirit of Freud, rendering him as a tightly coiled mass of energy, ready to spring from the caned bentwood chair positioned in front of a brass bed,” said Chief Curator Bruce Guenther. “The expressive, volatile brushwork that delineates Freud’s hands and face acts as a brilliant foil to the smooth rendering of the highly abstracted objects and space.”

First shown in Italy and subsequently in Bacon’s retrospective at the Grand Palais, Paris, in 1971-72, the triptych was separated and sold into three different private collections. It disappeared from view for more than 15 years before being reunited by an Italian collector in the 1990s. With this exhibition, this magnificent work comes into public view for a limited time before returning to a private collection.

The Masterworks / Portland series brings internationally significant works to Portland and provides an opportunity to study a single object and artist in depth. Masterpieces featured in the past include Raphael’s La Velata, Titian’s La Bella, and Thomas Moran’s Shoshone Falls on the Snake River.

The exhibition is organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Bruce Guenther, chief curator and The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. This special installation is made possible in part through the support of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation.

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For more information, please contact:

Beth Heinrich
Director of Public Relations
503-276-4370


In Memoriam Mercedes Hester Eichholz 1917 – 2013
Monday, August 26, 2013

The Trustees and staff of the Portland Art Museum mourn the passing of civic and arts philanthropist
Mercedes Hester Eichholz who passed away at her home in Santa Barbara on August 22.

Last year, the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation gave $2 million to endow
the Museum’s curator of modern and contemporary art.

Mercedes Eichholz and her late husband Robert were active supporters of the arts for decades, including connections with the National Gallery of Art and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Mrs. Eichholz lived in Portland with her first husband C. Girard Davidson from the late 1930s to the 1950s and was involved with the Museum during that time. Her son, Michael Davidson, is a Portland resident and a Museum member.

The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation was established to support the arts and is overseen by its trustees, including family members Michael Davidson, his sister Joan H. Davidson of Santa Ynez, California, and her daughter Alexa D. Suskin, Brooklyn.

“Mrs. Eichholz leaves a distinguished legacy of supporting art on the West Coast from Santa Barbara to Portland. The Eichholz endowment at the Museum ensures a strong curatorial presence in modern and contemporary art in perpetuity for our community,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director. “Her generosity and leadership has enabled the fulfillment of our mission and strengthened the program of the Portland Art Museum.”

 

 

For more information:

Beth Heinrich
503-276-4370

 

 


Museum & Partners Celebrate Cyclepedia with Free Family & Community Day
Thursday, July 25, 2013

In celebration of the Museum’s popular exhibition Cyclepedia, the Museum presents a Family and Community Day with free admission and special activities in the Museum courtyard and surrounding streets on Sunday, August 4, from noon to 5 p.m.

A highlight of the day will be Clever Cycles' annual “Fiets of Parenthood”—a family cargo bike race and obstacle course in front of the Museum. Learn more at http://fietsofparenthoodpdx.wordpress.com/. Races will begin at 1:30 p.m.

The day will also feature musical performances including an appearance by the Portland Unipiper—he plays his bagpipes atop a unicycle while wearing a kilt and Darth Vader mask! Also appearing will be D.J. Anjali and the Incredible Kid as well as local musician Mo Phillips. Be sure to ride your bike or bring your helmet since everyone will be invited to decorate them with incredible materials provided by SCRAP. Also add your touch to the creation of a collaborative bike sculpture provided by the Community Cycling Center. If you get hungry, enjoy both sweet and savory treats from pedal-powered food carts. And don’t forget to head inside the Museum to visit Cyclepedia and admire the beauty of bicycle design through nearly a century of innovations.

Hop in the saddle and enjoy free and easy bike parking.

Family programs are generously supported in part by Sharon L. Miller and Family, the Gordon D. Sondland and Katherine J. Durant Foundation, and the Lamb Baldwin Foundation. Special thanks to our community partners in organizing the day: Clever Cycles, Fiets of Parenthood, Community Cycling Center, Kidical Mass, Rejuiced Bikes, and SCRAP.

 


Shine a Light 2013 Invites Visitors to Reimagine Portland Art Museum
Friday, May 10, 2013

Portland Art Museum’s popular Shine a Light 2013 once again asks visitors to reconsider what is possible in a museum.

On Friday, May 17, visitors will engage with the Museum in unexpected ways and celebrate socially engaged works of art. They will rethink their relationship to art through a broad array of artist-driven installations, performances, and interventions throughout the Museum, including projects focused on the role of women in art; a geocaching game; mobile dentistry; and even a re-creation of an early Grateful Dead show in the historic Mark Building, among many others. Fabulous food and drink will be available for purchase from local vendors including Tastebud, Salt & Straw, and Captured by Porches.

This year Shine a Light welcomes noted artist and educator Paul Ramirez Jonas, who is helping to shape the experience of the night in partnership with artists and Museum staff. 

“We’re so pleased to be working with Paul Ramirez Jonas for this year’s Shine a Light event,” says Stephanie Parrish, the Museum’s associate director of education and public programs. “Paul’s work explores the exchanges between artist and audience, between an artwork and its viewer. We’re fortunate to have him as a creative collaborator for Shine a Light, where artists and the public come together to co-produce museum experiences and adjust our perspective of where art, artists and institutions intersect in our everyday lives.”

One of the Museum’s most popular annual events since it started in 2009, Shine a Light 2013 marks the fourth collaboration between the Museum and Portland State University’s Art and Social Practice program. Focusing on socially engaged art practice, the Master of Fine Arts program blends critical and professional practice, collaborative social engagement, and transdisciplinary exploration to produce an immersive educational environment. For more information about the program, visit psusocialpractice.org.

For the first time, Shine a Light is scheduled to coincide with Open Engagement, an annual international conference at Portland State University that sets out to explore various perspectives on art and social practice and expand the dialogue around socially engaged art making. For more information, visit openengagement.info

General admission to Shine a Light is $15, or $12 for college students without the Museum’s College Pass. Admission is free for Museum members, College Pass holders, and children 17 and under. Advance purchase of tickets online is recommended. For more about Museum membership benefits, visit portlandartmuseum.org/membership.

About the Portland Art Museum
Founded in 1892, the Portland Art Museum (www.portlandartmuseum.org) is the seventh oldest museum in the United States and the oldest in the Pacific Northwest. The Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions, drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 45,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of art of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, theMuseum devotes 90 percent of its gallery space to its permanent collection. For more information visit: http://www.portlandartmuseum.org

 

Click here to download the news release (PDF)

 

Click here to download the catalog (PDF)

 

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Receives Gift of Art from Blount International, Inc.
Thursday, April 25, 2013

The Portland Art Museum recently received a gift of art from Blount International, Inc. The gift includes 32 works of Northwest art that will join the Museum’s permanent collection of regional art.

“We are pleased that we can help expand the Portland Art Museum‘s Northwest collection,” stated David Willmott, President and Chief Operating Officer for Blount International. “Our gift to the Museum will provide greater access to the collection as well as provide the artwork with the long-term care it deserves.”

According to Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art, the gift includes a selection of works that bridge gaps in the Museum’s growing collection of Northwest art. The works of art allow the Museum to tell the story of the evolution of art from this region in greater depth.

The donated art includes works by noted Northwest artists including Louis Bunce, Sally Haley, Charles Voorhies, Carl Morris, and Judith Poxson Fawkes. The addition of these works allows the Museum to show the strength of the modernist imperative as it evolved into the region’s current contemporary art scene.

This corporate art collection was built by John Gray, who retired as Vice Chairman of the company in 1985 when it was known as Omark Industries,and William “Red” Blount, Founder and past Chairman of Blount International.

“We were delighted to receive the generous gift of art from Blount International,” said Laing-Malcolmson. “The collection handsomely demonstrates the love for the best of our region’s artists by two dedicated philanthropists.”

About Blount International, Inc.
Blount is a global manufacturer and marketer of replacement parts, equipment, and accessories for consumers and professionals operating primarily in two market segments: Forestry, Lawn, and Garden ("FLAG"); and Farm, Ranch, and Agriculture ("FRAG"). Blount also sells products in the construction markets and is the market leader in manufacturing saw chain and guide bars for chain saws. Blount has a global manufacturing and distribution footprint and sells its products in more than 115 countries around the world. Blount markets its products primarily under the OREGON®, Carlton®, Woods®, TISCO, SpeeCo®, and ICS® brands. For more information about Blount, please visit our website at http://www.blount.com

About the Portland Art Museum
Founded in 1892, the Portland Art Museum is the seventh oldest museum in the United States and the oldest in the Pacific Northwest. The Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions, drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 45,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of art of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its gallery space to its permanent collection. For more information, visit http://www.portlandartmuseum.org


Click here to download the news release (PDF)


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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Cyclepedia: Iconic Bicycle Design
Wednesday, April 10, 2013

PORTLAND, Ore. — Portland has been dubbed “the vanguard of American cycling” making the Portland Art Museum the ideal venue to host an exhibition exploring iconic bicycle design and celebrating bike culture.

Drawn from the collection of Vienna-based designer and bike aficionado Michael Embacher, this special exhibition features some 30 bicycles chosen by Embacher as examples of pivotal moments in the evolution of bicycle design.

Cyclepedia is the third entry in the Museum’s design-oriented exhibition series. Preceded by China Design Now and The Allure of the Automobile, Cyclepedia investigates the impact on bicycle design aesthetically and practically. The exhibition includes bikes of all shapes and sizes—from world-class racing bikes to novelty bikes. Also included are bicycles designed for unique purposes including riding in a war zone, across frozen ground, and with more than one person on board. The exhibition and related programming will also explore the impact of bicycles on culture and lifestyle—locally and around the world.

Designed by Embacher, the exhibition will be unique in its presentation. The featured bicycles will be suspended from a frame in the ceiling that will wind its way through the galleries, giving the bikes the appearance of moving through an imaginary landscape of gently rolling hills. This installation technique will allow visitors to experience the bicycles both collectively and individually.

With a personal love of bicycles and a professional expertise in design, Embacher has passionately collected bicycles since 2003. His inquisitive interest in creative, rare, offbeat, and even bravely failed models led to the creation of his unique collection. The Embacher Collection is distinguished by more than 200 functioning bicycles and the rarity of the objects. The collection has been documented and celebrated in the publication, Cyclepedia: A Century of Iconic Bicycle Design, described by the London Sunday Times as the most comprehensive and visually satisfying book of bicycle portraits ever published. An iPad app, rated App of the Week in the UK iTunes store, also explores the collection.

Portland has more cyclists per capita than any other city in America. The Portland Art Museum is pleased to be the only U.S. venue for this exhibition celebrating the best of bicycles.

A Celebration of Portland Bicycles
In addition to exploring bicycles from an internationally renowned collection in Cyclepedia, experience the best of local bicycle collectors and designers. Each week during the summer the Museum will showcase a different bicycle with a local connection. For a complete schedule visit portlandartmuseum.org.

Click here to download the complete news release.


PRESENTING SPONSOR: Provenance Hotels. LEAD SPONSORS: Cycle Oregon, Wells Fargo. PELOTON SOCIETY: Ann and Mark Edlen and Family, Showers Pass, Clever Cycle, West End Bikes, Anonymous.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
Thursday, January 31, 2013

PORTLAND, Ore. — Born and raised in Portland, Ore., Carrie Mae Weems is internationally recognized for her powerful photography-based art that investigates issues of race, gender and societal class. Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video, opening Saturday at the Portland Art Museum, presents more than 200 photographs, videos, and installations tracing the evolution of Weems’ career.

Given a camera on her 21st birthday, she quickly realized its potential to express abstract political and social theories and incite change. For the next 30 years, her work has explored a variety of issues, providing a complex picture of humanity and creating greater awareness and compassion for difference.

About the Exhibition
Featuring some of her most groundbreaking work, including Ain’t Jokin’, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, Ritual and Revolution, and the recent series Constructing History: A Requiem to Mark the Moment; Weems’ work will challenge audiences by highlighting issues of power, race, and gender.

The exhibition is organized largely chronologically but several works are placed side by side to show the progression of her work. The exhibition begins with Colored People from 1989 which investigates the beauty and hierarchy found in skin tones within the African American community. The work includes portraits of black children which have been toned a color to correspond to various labels. Colored People is installed next to Untitled (colored People Grid), from 2009, which continues Weems’ exploration of “colorism” nearly 20 years later.

In addition to tracing the artist’s progression through time, the exhibition is organized around three themes: the construction of identity, the legacy of history, and the power of place.

Visitors will find variety in the exhibition with photographs, videos, and installation works. Ritual and Revolution (1998) is a stunning work of hanging translucent scrims taking the viewer—as they walk through the installation—on a journey around the world and through history exploring the universal struggle for equality and justice.

Weems’ hauntingly beautiful images cause viewers to consider challenging issues of identity, gender, race, and power.

This is not the first time that the Museum has featured Weems’ photography. In 1994, the Museum presented an early exhibition of the artist’s work. This earlier exhibition, Carrie Mae Weems, was organized by the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Opening during Black History Month, this retrospective will engage audiences in discussions of the African-American experience through art. Programs and community partnerships include Portland Center Stage’s production of Clybourne Park and the Oregon History Museum’s exhibition All Aboard: Railroading and Portland’s Black Community.

Organized by the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video was curated by Frist Center Curator Kathryn Delmez. Julia Dolan, Ph.D., The Minor White Curator of Photography curated its presentation in Portland.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Folkert de Jong
Wednesday, January 02, 2013

PORTLAND, Ore. — Like a slap in the face, the sculptures of Dutch artist Folkert de Jong have an overwhelming immediacy of materiality and historically reference imagery that is emotionally powerful and strangely sublime.

Part jester, part moralist, de Jong has attracted international attention for his savagely dark figurative sculptures that combine references to art, world history, current events, and popular culture.

The Museum presents two major sculptures and recent drawings that are best understood against the backdrop of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the worldwide economic crisis. Unsettlingly raw and lacking decorum, his Styrofoam and polyurethane foam works challenge our assumptions of high art and comfort with the conventions of human depiction in gruesome tableaus like Operation Harmony.

Amsterdam-based de Jong has exhibited internationally since the early 2000s and has been the recipient of a number of awards including the prestigious Prix de Rome for sculpture in 2003, and the Den Haag Sculptuur ‘Orange Award,’ 2005. His work was most recently featured in a major solo exhibition organized by the Groninger Museum, the Netherlands.

Curated by Bruce Guenther, chief curator and The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Sponsored in part by the Miller Meigs Endowment for the Contemporary Arts and the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Lend your voice! Participate in a Marathon Reading of Homer’s The Iliad
Monday, November 26, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — On Sunday, December 2, hundreds of citizens will gather at the Portland Art Museum to revive the ancient Greek tradition of reading poetry aloud.

From 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., 400 individuals of all ages and backgrounds will relive the thrilling story of the Trojan war, participating in a daylong marathon reading of Homer’s The Iliad, produced by the international literary organization The Readers of Homer in association with the Portland Art Museum.

Representatives of cultural societies and communities based in Portland, visitors, artists, journalists, professors and teachers, parents and students are expected to join hundreds of citizens who will read or sing their passages, each in their own way and language, one after the other, over the course of 10 hours.

Their common aim will be to add their voices in celebration of the Museum’s international exhibition The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece which features Greek and Roman sculpture from The British Museum.

The reading will be coordinated with on-stage projections of archaic and classical images from the Portland Art Museum and The Readers of Homer archives, along with the English version of the epic, a mosaic of segments from Pope’s and Fitzgerald’s translations and Christopher Logue’s Iliad.

TICKETS available now at www.portlandartmuseum.org or www.thereadersofhomer.org

$15 Adults (includes admission that day to The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece)
$5 Students
$5 Museum Members
FREE for PSU Students and Under 17
FREE ENTRANCE FOR NON-READERS

The event is organized with the kind support of the Hellenic Studies Program at Portland State University. Additional support provided by the University of Portland, Reed College, Willamette University, Lewis & Clark College, Portland Community College, Literary Arts, and EllinikoTheatro.

More info: www.thereadersofhomer.org

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece
Thursday, October 04, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — Selected from the world-famous Greek and Roman collection of the British Museum, the Portland Art Museum presents The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece, a visually stunning and thought-provoking exploration of the human condition seen through ancient Greek eyes.

Opening October 6, the exhibition presents a diverse selection of some 130 objects exploring the Greeks’ fascination with the human body and humanity which was pervasive in ancient Greek culture. The development of the human body in art was driven by the ancient Greek lust for life and constant enquiry.

The exhibition is divided into 10 sections:

  • The male body
  • Aphrodite and the female body
  • The divine body
  • Herakles, Superman
  • Athletes
  • Birth, marriage, and death
  • Sex and desire
  • Outsiders
  • Character and realism
  • The human face

Visitors will travel back in time to Olympia and the Acropolis, sites that were central to the subject and presentation of Greek art. Olympia and other athletic fields were theaters for the display of the athletic male body. Athletics were central to Greek life and young men engaged in sports to prepare for battle. Even religious festivals included sporting contests, which attracted athletes and spectators from throughout the Greek world. The Olympic festival was the oldest, held every four years from 776 BC in honor of the god Zeus.

The idealized male body was a common subject of Greek art. The earliest images are schematic and emphasize the essential elements of manhood. But by the fifth century BC, the male figure appears relaxed with greater realism. The exhibition traces this artistic evolution from prehistoric simplicity to the realism of the Hellenistic age.

Caring for the body and keeping fit were social obligations in the ancient Greek world and were considered crucial to the raising of male citizens. Athletics were a form of training for warfare and most Greek men could expect to be called to fight for their city-state. Physical perfection was also considered a reflection of inner moral rectitude. Athletes trained and competed naked and victorious athletes gained near heroic status and might be commemorated with statues.

The Discobolus, or discus-thrower, is one of the most important images from the ancient world and one of the highlights of the exhibition. This statute represents the height of the ideal of male beauty and athleticism. It shows an athlete—naked, refined, and eternally youthful— seemingly captured in the moment before releasing the discus. The sculpture is designed to be seen from a single viewpoint. The composition is contained in one shallow plane with the limbs and torso artificially arranged to correspond with Greek ideas of balance and rhythm. The chest faces the viewer while the curvature of the arms intersects with the line formed by the head and spine, evoking the shape and energy of a drawn bow.

This marble statue is one of several copies of a lost bronze original of the fifth century BC. The head on this figure has been wrongly restored, and should be turned to look toward the discus.

While the male body was almost always shown naked, the female body was usually shown clothed. However, fertility cults, sex scenes, and the representations of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, provided opportunities for female nudity. While frequently draped, the Greek artists left little to the imagination in their depictions of the female form.

Openly sexual images were common in Greek art and found on a wide range of artifacts including those for everyday use. The naked human form often represented explicitly sexual context, but the intention was not always to arouse desire but rather to celebrate fertility or the worship of Dionysos, god of wine. However, some images were designed to arouse, including depictions of orgies, exchanges with courtesans, and homosexuality.

Part of the Greeks’ humanism was their worship of gods of human form. These gods were distinguished from their human subjects by their immortality and supernatural powers. The idea of a family of gods living on Mount Olympos, a mountain in northern Greece, is first found in Homer’s poetry of the eighth century BC. Each deity had his or her own association—Poseidon and the sea, Aphrodite and love, Ares and war, and so on.

The Greeks also celebrated heroes, and the greatest of these was Herakles, the ultimate strongman. Hera, the jealous wife of Zeus, hated Herakles because he was Zeus’ son by a mortal woman. She sent a fit of madness upon him and he killed his wife and children. To atone, he performed 12 labors and was eventually rewarded for his struggles with immortality and a place among the gods. His story was an example of how physical endurance could lead to the rewards of victory. Herakles is the legendary founder of the Olympic Games and a patron god of the gymnasium.

The imaginative world of ancient Greek myth also included a cast of strange monsters. Many combined human with animal parts as symbols of their otherworldliness. For the Greeks, these imaginary outsiders served to contrast with their own civilized society and behavior. Creatures such as satyrs, part man and part horse or goat, are shown behaving in wild ways which express the baser human instincts.

In early Greek art, human differences of age, gender, and ethnicity were represented in general terms. However, through time, the horizons of the Greek experience were expanded leading to greater realism in the portrayal of individuals in art and a demand for portraits of famous men, and the occasional woman.

The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece explores the Greeks’ fascination with the human body and humanity which was pervasive in ancient Greek culture. In drama, philosophy, history, scientific medicine, and the natural sciences at large, Greeks were the first to direct the human mind on its modern quest for self-knowledge. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore some of the most important objects from one of the most important periods in the history of Western civilization.

This exhibition is a collaboration between the British Museum and the Portland Art Museum.

Catalogue & Audio Guide
The exhibition is accompanied by a 175-page, full-color catalogue available in the Museum Shop. A free audio guide of the exhibition will be accessible on personal mobile devices or available on the Museum’s iPods which can be checked out in the lobby.

Images
High resolution images are available in the Portland Art Museum’s online press office.
All images © The Trustees of the British Museum 2012. All rights reserved.

Exhibition Details
The exhibition is a collaboration between the British Museum and the Portland Art Museum.

Curators

Ian Jenkins and Victoria Turner
The British Museum

Host Curator

Bruce Guenther, chief curator
Portland Art Museum

When October 6, 2012 – January 6, 2013
Where

Portland Art Museum
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205-2430

Hours

Tues, Wed, and Sat: 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
Thurs and Fri: 10 a.m.–8 p.m.
Sun: Noon–5 p.m.

Admission

Tickets are timed for entry and available at the
box office or online at portlandartmuseum.org

Members: Free
Children (17 and under): Free
Adults: $20
Seniors (55 and older): $17
Students (18 and older with ID): $17

 Museum Information 503-226-2811, portlandartmuseum.org
 Museum Box Office 503-226-0973

 

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Names First Curator of European Art
Friday, August 24, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — Following an international search, Dawson W. Carr, Ph.D., has been appointed the first Janet and Richard Geary Curator of European Art. As the first full-time European curator in the Museum’s 120-year history, he will be responsible for all European painting, sculpture, and drawings prior to 1850. Carr is currently the Curator of Spanish and Italian Paintings 1500-1800 and Head of Display at The National Gallery, London.

“Through the generosity of Janet and Richard Geary, the Museum has attracted an internationally known scholar from a prestigious institution to Portland,” said Chief Curator Bruce Guenther. “Carr has a sterling reputation in the field with a distinguished record of exhibitions and publications.”

Since joining The National Gallery in 2003, Carr has organized two of its most popular exhibitions: Caravaggio: The Final Years and Velázquez. He also curated Pompeo Batoni, 1708-1787 and Venice: Canaletto and his Rivals, which later traveled to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. He was instrumental in two major acquisitions to the distinguished London collection: Annibale Carracci’s Montalto Madonna and Giovanni Paolo Panini’s The Lottery in Piazza di Montecitorio, Rome.

Carr specializes in Italian and Spanish art of the 16th and 17th centuries, but has worked in a variety of areas. He has published widely in his field from individual catalogue entries to masterwork guides to the collection and monographic exhibition catalogues. He has been a frequent contributor to American and European scholarly journals and publications such as Apollo and Burlington Magazine. His Looking at Paintings: A Guide to Technical Terms, written with conservator Mark Leonard, remains a popular dictionary of the subject.

Prior to his tenure at The National Gallery, Carr served as a curator of paintings at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Calif., and was actively involved in the rapid development of the collection in the decade before the opening of the museum. He created the first major European exhibition at the Getty Center, Dosso Dossi: Court Painter in Renaissance Ferrara.

Carr holds doctorate and master degrees from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. He trained at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, where as an undergraduate he developed a love for Spanish art.

“Dr Carr will bring fresh scholarship to the Museum’s collection and lead a new initiative in the Museum’s collecting and exhibitions. His presence in our community will serve to focus the institution and its patrons on the European core,” noted Guenther.

Richard and Janet Geary, long-time patrons and trustees of the Museum, endowed this position in 2008. Life Trustee Laura Meier and her late husband Roger S. Meier established an endowment in 2005 to support Museum exhibitions and programs of European Art from the permanent collection and important international loans.

Carr will begin his tenure in Portland in January 2013.

“When I visited Portland to interview for the job, I was completely seduced. I feel very fortunate to be moving to such a beautiful and interesting place, but even more to be assuming a position with such potential. It is evident from past gifts of works of art that the European tradition has long resonated with Portlanders. I hope to explore some old favorites in exhibitions, publications, and lectures, but also to encourage the acquisition of great works of art that will enhance the collection as a source of knowledge and inspiration,” said Carr.

About the European Collection
Since the Museum’s founding in 1892, European art has been at the core of the permanent collection. Museum founder Henry Corbett gave $10,000, which helped purchase the first acquisitions to the permanent and European collections: 100 plaster casts of Greek and Roman sculptures. The sculptures were chosen by Museum founder Winslow B. Ayer, who spent several months selecting works for the Museum from galleries and museums in Europe. In 1895, the Corbett Collection, as the casts were known, was installed. An instant success, the collection was considered Portland’s most important and popular cultural resource.

Today, the collection occupies a sequence of galleries on the Main Building’s second floor allowing visitors to follow the works from the 17th century back to Classical Antiquity or forward to the 19th century. A gallery of classical antiquities displays a selection of Greek, Roman, and Etruscan objects, including red- and black-figure vases, small bronzes, and glass drawn from the Sally Lewis Collection donated to the Museum in 1926.

Several important paintings were acquired in the early decades of the 20th century, but it was through two significant bequests, the 1935 Winslow B. Ayer bequest and the 1943 C.F. Adams bequest, that the Museum acquired the French 18th-century Impressionist paintings at the core of the European collection. The 1960s and 1970s brought a significant group of French 18th- century paintings through the generosity of Dr. Edwin Binney, 3rd. The continuing enrichment of the collection into the present has resulted in the Museum’s collection being the largest group of old master works available to the public in the Northwest.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Announces New Director of Education and Public Programs
Tuesday, July 24, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Portland Art Museum is pleased to announce the appointment of Michael Murawski, Ph.D., as director of education and public programs. Murawski will begin his tenure on October 15.

“This is an important role at the Museum. Our education programs expand and amplify the visitor’s experience in the galleries through innovative installations, lectures with leading scholars, and special programs for school children, college students, artists, educators, and adult learners,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director. “I am pleased that we have been able to recruit and hire Mike Murawski, one of today’s leading thinkers around art museum education.”

In his new position, Murawski will be responsible for creating a vision for the Museum’s public programs for families, students, and adults and ensuring the highest quality for all education programs.

“I am so excited to step into this new role at the Portland Art Museum and become part of a distinguished institution dedicated to creating compelling experiences for all visitors,” said Murawski. “I look forward to working with their exceptional team to further strengthen the Museum’s role in the community and help shape the Museum’s vision for the future.”

Murawski is currently the director of school services at the Saint Louis Art Museum. In this role he directs all school, teacher, and docent programs for the Museum and creates programs, tours, and partnerships for K-12 students, facilitating innovative museum learning. The programs serve approximately 35,000 students per year.

Prior to his work at the Saint Louis Art Museum, he was the coordinator of education and public programs at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University, Saint Louis.

Murawski holds both master and doctorate degrees in education from American University, Washington, D.C. and received a bachelor’s degree in art history from Truman State University, Missouri.

“We are confident that Mike will continue to strengthen our existing programs such as Object Stories, Shine a Light, and Artist Talks while creating a vision for the future to help the Museum deliver its important mission in our community,” said Ferriso.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Announces Finalists for 2013 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
Tuesday, July 17, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — Today, the Portland Art Museum announced the finalists for the next Contemporary Northwest Art Awards, an awards exhibition celebrating contemporary art created in the greater Northwest (Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana). The exhibition will open at the Museum in the fall of 2013.

Artist State
Anne Appleby Montana
Rick Araluce Washington
Hayley Barker Oregon
Debra Baxter Washington
Gretchen Bennett Washington
Leo Berk Washington
Cris Bruch Washington
Karl Burkheimer Oregon
Laurel Bustamante Oregon
Sang-Ah Choi Oregon
Claire Cowie Washington
Anna Gray & Ryan Wilson-Paulson Oregon
Wynn Greenwood Washington
Jeremy Hatch Montana
Victoria Haven Washington
Blake Haygood Washington
Laura Hughes Oregon
Kate Hunt Montana
Issac Layman Washington
Nickolus Meisel Washington
Abbie Miller Wyoming
Donald Morgan Oregon
Nicholas Nyland Washington
Matthew Offenbacher Washington
Jay Schmidt Montana
Heidi Schwegler Oregon
Tip Toland Washington
Trimpin Washington

 

The Selection Process
Regional arts professionals, including curators, artists, dealers, academics, and critics were invited to nominate visual artists based on the quality of their work, innovation, relevance to community or global issues in the arts, continuity of vision, commitment to their practice, and level of development in their career. The Museum received 239 nominations and invited the nominated artists to submit application materials. Of the nominated artists, 176 submitted materials for review.

Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art, and guest curatorial advisor Apsara DiQinzio, the newly appointed curator of modern and contemporary art at The Berkeley Art Museum, reviewed the nominees’ materials and selected the 28 finalists.

Laing-Malcolmson will visit the artist’s studios during the next several months. This fall, she will present her recommendations to the Museum’s director and curatorial staff for the final review. The Museum anticipates announcing the award recipients prior to January 2013. These artists will be featured in the 2013 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition opening in September.

About the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
The Contemporary Northwest Art Awards honors artistic merit and potential while providing an in-depth and scholarly presentation of work by several promising and/or nationally under-recognized professional contemporary artists living and working in the Northwest. The awards recipients are honored with an exhibition in the Museum’s special exhibition galleries, a full-color catalogue, exhibition-related programming, and cash awards. One recipient will be further recognized with the Arlene Schnitzer Prize in the amount of $10,000. The finalists announced today will be recognized in the catalogue.

The Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition, presented by the Portland Art Museum, is funded in part by The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowments for Northwest Art.

About The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowments for Northwest Art
The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowments for Northwest Art support the exhibition activities of the Center for Northwest Art including the APEX series, related publications, the curatorial position, and the development of the Museum’s growing collection.

From the beginning, the Museum’s permanent collection has been shaped by the art and culture of the Northwest. The Schnitzer Center for Northwest Art brings the Museum's regional collections to the forefront and celebrates a history of art making that extends from the late 19th century to the present in the five-state region of the Northwest.

The Center occupies the third and fourth floors of the Museum’s Hoffman Wing and presents the collection in rotation as well as APEX, an ongoing exhibition series dedicated to contemporary art of the region.


About the Portland Art Museum
The seventh oldest museum in the United States and the oldest on the West Coast, the Portland Art Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 40,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of arts of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution, dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, the Museum dedicates 90 percent of its galleries to its permanent collection. The Museum’s campus of landmark buildings, a cornerstone of Portland’s cultural district, includes the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art, the Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts, the Schnitzer Center for Northwest Art, the Northwest Film Center, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Center for Native American Art. With a membership of over 22,000 households and serving more than 350,000 visitors annually, the Museum is a premier venue for education in the visual arts. For information on exhibitions and programs, call 503.226.2811 or visit portlandartmuseum.org.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum to present Invitational Plein Air Paint Out
Thursday, June 14, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — In concert with the Museum’s exhibition California Impressionism, the Portland Art Museum will present the Invitational Plein Air Paint Out the first weekend in August.

Celebrate the art of painting outdoors, en plein air, with the region’s leading plein air artists. Like their late 19th and early 20th century counterparts, contemporary plein air artists work on location to capture the atmosphere of the moment, including the ever-changing colors, light, and shadows. This event brings together dozens of artists to create new works and exhibit them in the Museum’s front yard by turning the South Park Blocks into a lively outdoor studio.

Saturday, August 4
All day, invited plein air artists will roam the South Park Blocks and surrounding area to paint many of your favorite landscapes and landmarks with oils, watercolors, and pastels. Artists will begin at first light and paint throughout the day. Visitors are encouraged to watch and talk with the painters as they translate the landscape in front of their eyes to canvas.

Sunday, August 5
Wander the Museum courtyard to meet the artists and see a selection of works made the day before. Take advantage of this opportunity to take home a work of art.

Check the Museum website, www.portlandartmuseum.org, for updated information about the weekend.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum
Thursday, June 14, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Portland Art Museum is pleased to present California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum, opening June 16.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, California artists produced a unique style that combined several distinctive aspects of American and European art. This style—known as California Impressionism or California plein air painting, after the French term for “in the open air”—focused on capturing the special light and color of the state’s landscape and helped to define modern landscape painting.

Impressionism was initially embraced by a small group of radical artists working in France during the late 1860s. Their work was greeted with scorn and criticism by the Royal Academy and the public. By the time Impressionism was introduced in the United States around 1885-90, much of the hostility had dissipated and the style was favorably received. Many of America’s leading artists studied Impressionism in Paris and brought it back to the United States, invigorating progressive American art. California’s majestic landscape was the inspiration for artists who came to the burgeoning turn-of-the-century art colonies in Carmel and Laguna Beach. They created a profusion of light-filled paintings that captured its sublime but fragile beauty, in a Post-Impressionist manner that established a new, distinctive modern style. Just as earlier French artists had captured the colors and light of rural France, this indigenous West Coast school of artists dedicated itself to portraying the brilliant and convincing effects of natural light on the local landscape in a fresh American voice.

This exhibition explores the impact of Impressionism and modernism on American painters from the West Coast and features many of the most important artists of the period, including Franz Bischoff, Emil Kosa, Phil Dike, Edgar Payne, William Wendt, Guy Rose, and Granville Redmond.

Don’t miss this stunning collection of 60 paintings from the collection of The Irvine Museum, California.

Organized by The Irvine Museum and host curated by Bruce Guenther, chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Special Programs Celebrate Ellsworth Kelly / Prints
Thursday, June 14, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Portland Art Museum has organized two special programs for its exhibition Ellsworth Kelly / Prints (June 16 – September 16, 2012). The programs give visitors the chance to learn more about the artist and the collection featured in the exhibition.

July 29, 2 p.m.
The Prints of Ellsworth Kelly
Richard H. Axsom, Curator, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art
Author of the catalogue raisonné and a leading scholar on Ellsworth Kelly, Axsom will present an overview of Kelly’s achievements in print media. Exploring his dynamic geometry of squared, angled, and curved forms to great effect in his graphic editions, Kelly’s prints, no less than the paintings and sculptures, have their own distinctive voice.

September 6, 6 p.m.
Collecting Ellsworth Kelly
Jordan D. Schnitzer, Past Trustee and Philanthropist
Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director

What draws the eye of a major art collector and how does a collection come together over time? Schnitzer, one of the leading collectors of works on paper, will exchange ideas with Ferriso about what drives his passion and support of contemporary art, artists, and cultural institutions.

Programs are free for members or with Museum admission. Space may be limited. Advance tickets are recommended and available online or on site.


About the Exhibition
Featuring more than eighty prints from Jordon D. Schnitzer and his family foundation, Ellsworth Kelly/Prints celebrates the work of one of the most important American artists of the last fifty years. Kelly has redefined abstract art through his bold paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings. The exhibition explores Kelly’s use of key formal motifs in his graphic work: chromatic contrast, grids, right angles, and curves.

Organized by the Portland Art Museum with the cooperation of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and curated by Mary Weaver Chapin, Ph.D., Curator of Graphic Arts.

For more information on the exhibition and its programs, visit portlandartmuseum.org.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Ellsworth Kelly / Prints
Thursday, June 14, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — This weekend The Portland Art Museum opens Ellsworth Kelly / Prints featuring more than 80 prints from Jordan D. Schnitzer and his family foundation. The exhibition celebrates the work of one of the most important American artists of the last 50 years.

“We are pleased to have the opportunity to collaborate with Jordan on this important project celebrating the work of Ellsworth Kelly,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director. “Jordan’s collecting breadth has allowed us to provide a unique opportunity for our audiences to understand fully the larger vision of this American master.”

Ellsworth Kelly has redefined abstract art through his bold paintings, sculpture, prints, and drawings. Born in 1923 in Newburgh, N.Y., Kelly studied at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn until the age of 20, when he was drafted into the U.S. Army during World War II. He spent the majority of his military service in Europe. From 1948 through 1954, he lived in France, traveling and studying art and architecture.

French abstraction greatly influenced the young artist, whose style changed drastically during his time in Europe. He abandoned figuration and traditional easel painting, choosing instead to create a vocabulary of simple geometric shapes in pure, vibrant color. Kelly’s visual vocabulary is drawn from observations of the world around him—shapes and silhouettes found in plants, architecture, shadows on a wall—and has developed from his interest in the space between places and objects and between his work and its viewer. Kelly has said, “In my work, I don’t want you to look at the surface; I want you to look at the form, the relationships.”

In the words of catalogue raisonné author Richard Axsom, Kelly’s prints “exchange the totemic presence, the tangible physicality and public assertiveness of the paintings and sculptures for the qualities no less genuine in registering Kelly’s vision: intimacy, delicacy, and in nearly immaterial veils of shape and color, an unmatched ethereality.”

Ellsworth Kelly / Prints was organized in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which recently staged the first retrospective of Kelly’s prolific print practice since 1988 and host curated by Mary Weaver Chapin, Ph.D., curator of graphic art.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Singular Francis Bacon Painting on View
Wednesday, May 30, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — First shown in Paris in 1977 where it created a sensation when 8,000 people thronged Saint Germain to see the exhibition at the Galerie Claude Bernard, Figure Writing Reflected in Mirror (1976) has spent more than 30 years in a European private collection. Setting a new auction record this spring for the Dublin-born English artist’s work, this major Bacon painting will go on view at the Portland Art Museum on June 2.

Considered one of the artist’s most significant paintings from the 1970s, the painting is an emotional and painterly summation of Bacon’s most important themes of the period. Figure Writing Reflected in Mirror depicts a muscular nude male figure absorbed in the act of writing with rejected sheets of text littering the foreground. Doubled in the mirror, the figure is considered a composite portrait of the artist and his working class lover and muse George Dyer, whose tragic suicide on the eve of Bacon’s important retrospective at the Grand Palais, Paris in 1971 was the subject or subtext of much of Bacon’s subsequent work. Elegiac and enigmatic, the work presents the dichotomy between vision and language, the figure in front of and inside the mirror.

Don’t miss this once in a lifetime opportunity to view this stunning work by one of the most important artists of the 20th century. The painting will be on view through September 2, 2012.

Organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Bruce Guenther, Chief Curator and The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. This special installation is made possible through the support of the Exhibition Series Sponsors.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Receives Donation of Reach Truck for Art Handling
Friday, May 11, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. — NACCO Materials Handling Group, Inc. (NMHG), in cooperation with it’s local dealer Papé Material Handling, Inc., has donated one of its Hyster® electric reach trucks to the Portland Art Museum. Hyster Company donated the electric reach truck and Papé Material Handling, Inc. donated the battery and charging unit.

The Hyster® electric reach truck will be used in the Museum’s storage facility to move and store valuable works of art in the Museum’s collection.

“We are grateful to Papé and Hyster Company for this donation,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr. Director. “Thanks to them, we will safely and confidently move and lift precious works of art that we can share with our visitors.”

“This is a small token of our appreciation for the contribution that the Portland Art Museum brings to the community of Portland and the people of the Pacific Northwest,” said Jonathan Dawley, President of Hyster Distribution.

“Like our friends and partners at Hyster Company, we too are members of this community and are happy to give back,” said Shirley Papé. “I am excited to know that it will be Papé products that are helping to share these works of art with members of our community.”

About the Portland Art Museum
Founded in 1892, the Portland Art Museum (www.portlandartmuseum.org) is the seventh oldest museum in the United States and the oldest in the Pacific Northwest. The Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions, drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 45,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of art of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its gallery space to its permanent collection.

About Papé Group, Inc.
Headquartered in Eugene, Ore., The Papé Group Inc. is a holding company for capital equipment dealerships throughout the West. The businesses of The Papé Group sell and service the premier brands of capital equipment used in construction projects, forestry, trucking, warehousing/materials handling and private aviation. The Papé Group businesses are Papé Material Handling Inc., Bobcat West, Ditch Witch Northwest, Engineered Products, Flightcraft Inc., Papé Rents, Papé Kenworth and Papé Machinery Inc. The operations serve seven western states – from Alaska to California. The cornerstone of all Papé Group operations since the first dealership was founded in 1938 has been their commitment to providing high quality products backed by consistent, high quality customer service wherever and whenever needed. For more information about The Papé Group Inc., visit www.pape.com.

About NACCO Materials Handling Group, Inc.
A world leader in the lift truck industry, NACCO Materials Handling Group, Inc. (NMHG) designs, engineers, manufactures, sells and services a comprehensive line of lift trucks and aftermarket parts marketed globally primarily under the Hyster® and Yale® brand names. Headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, NMHG employs approximately 5,300 people worldwide and is a wholly owned subsidiary of NACCO Industries, Inc. (NYSE: NC).

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Receives Significant Gift to Endowment
Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Eichholz Foundation endows curator of modern and contemporary art

The Portland Art Museum is pleased to announce that a gift of $2 million was recently pledged by the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation. The gift from the foundation, headquartered in Santa Barbara, Calif., will endow the curator of modern and contemporary art. The position, currently held by Bruce Guenther, will now be known as The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

“We are grateful to Mercedes Eichholz and her family’s foundation for this generous and important gift,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director. “Endowing curatorial positions ensures that the core mission of the Museum is fulfilled.”

Mercedes Eichholz and her late husband Robert have been active supporters of the arts for decades, including connections with the National Gallery of Art and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Mrs. Eichholz lived in Portland from the late 1930s to the 1950s and was involved with the Museum during that time. Her son, Michael Davidson, is a Portland resident and a Museum member.

The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation was established to support the arts and is overseen by its trustees, including family members Michael Davidson and daughter Alexa Davidson Suskin. The first installment of the pledged $2 million gift has been received by the Museum with the balance to be paid over the next three years.

“The importance of adding stability to the Museum by funding this curatorial position was key in the decision of the foundation,” said Mrs. Eichholz. “I hope that this gift will encourage others to step up and underwrite curatorial positions at the Museum or support the endowment.”

During the past five years the Museum has worked to endow all of its curatorial positions. With this gift, the Museum has five endowed curatorial positions and hopes to endow the remaining curatorial positions.

“A strong institutional endowment and endowments for key positions provides financial stability for the Museum’s mission in perpetuity,” said Ferriso. “This is the second major gift to the endowment in the past six months, following the endowment of the curator of photography in December. This reflects the quality of our curatorial staff, the excellence of the work they are doing in support of the mission, and the generosity and the leadership of donors like Mercedes Eichholz.”

About the Modern and Contemporary Art Collection
From its earliest days, the Museum has closely followed and supported contemporary art. In 1908, the Museum acquired its first original painting created by the American Impressionist Childe Hassam in the same year. From 1905 through the 1920s, exhibitions of avant-garde art were organized for presentation at the Museum by curator Anna B. Crocker and pioneering collector Sally Lewis, including Marcel Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and other momentous works from the controversial 1913 Armory Show in New York. Important collections of Impressionist and post-Impressionist works, including works by Monet, Pissarro, Renoir, and Degas, entered the permanent collection in the late 1920s and 1930s from the estates of founding members of the Museum.

The Museum began actively building a collection of 20th-century art in the late 1940s under the leadership of director Thomas Cole. A 1971 gift of funds in Evan H. Roberts’ name allowed a series of major sculpture purchases by artists such as Henry Moore, David Smith, Dan Flavin, and Mark Di Suvero to compliment the Museum’s Rodin, Degas, Brancusi, Picasso, and Archipenko holdings. In 2000, the Museum acquired the Clement Greenberg Collection of 159 paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings by some of the most important American artists of the mid-20th century. The acquisition, supported by patrons Tom and Gretchen Holce and Carol and John Hampton, along with a number of major gifts, resulted in a quantum leap in the collection. Today, the collection includes works that chronicle the development of Modernism from Courbet and the Impressionists through the 20th century to the video and digital art of the present worldwide.

The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Sculpture Court is dedicated to exhibiting large-scale works from the Museum’s holdings and loaned works by artists like Joseph Beuys, Chris Burden, and Bruce Nauman. In 2005, the Museum opened the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art to showcase the Greenberg Collection and accommodate the growing collection. Located on six floors of the Mark Building, the 28,000-square-foot Jubitz Center was established to present rotating selections of more than 400 works from the collection, in addition to special temporary contemporary art exhibitions of artists.

The Jubitz Center is connected to the Main Building by the underground Suwyn Gallery which features dossier contemporary exhibitions from the collection. As visitors exit the Suwyn Gallery and ascend six floors through the Jubitz Center, the installations trace the evolution of Modernism in roughly chronological order. A variety of media are incorporated into this 3 complex presentation, including traditional paintings and sculpture, photography, works on paper, decorative arts, new media, and time-based art such as video and sound works. Since 2005, the Jubitz Center has featured exhibitions from the Miller Meigs contemporary art series, which celebrates new ideas, mediums, and artists such as Sophie Calle, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, and Martin Kippenberger.

About Bruce Guenther
Bruce Guenther is the Portland Art Museum’s chief curator as well as its curator of modern and contemporary art since 2000. He has more than 30 years of museum experience, having served as curator or director at four noteworthy institutions including the Seattle Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Orange County Museum of Art.

Internationally recognized for his work in contemporary art, Guenther is sought after for his expertise as a public speaker, guest curator, juror, writer, and public arts advisor. For his work to promote international fellowship through contemporary art, Guenther was awarded the Officer’s Cross in the Order of Merit of the Republic of Austria in 1990.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

In Memoriam: Brian Booth
Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Statement from Museum Director Brian Ferriso

The trustees and staff of the Portland Art Museum mourn the passing of Brian Booth, past Chairman of the Board (1976-1978), a long-standing trustee who began his tenure in 1971, and a beloved friend to our Museum.

Brian not only served in a leadership role, but also together with his wife Gwyneth Gamble Booth, who also served as a Trustee, supported the Museum in many significant ways, including providing annual donations through membership for more than 30 years and as a patron member for more than 15. Additionally, significant funds were donated by Gwyneth and Brian to purchase several important works of art, including the Museum’s C.E.S. Wood Harney Desert painting Untitled (On the Snake River) from 1904-06. Gwyneth and Brian sponsored a number of groundbreaking exhibitions throughout the past 20 years, including the Oregon Biennial (2001), Rembrandt and The Golden Age of Dutch Art (2007), and PNCA at 100 (2009), and donated to every major capital campaign since 1993, including the acquisition of the Masonic Temple (now the Mark Building) in 1993, Project for the Millennium in 1999, and the North Building Campaign in 2005. As part of these campaigns, the Museum’s Korean Gallery is named in Gwyneth and Brian’s honor. Finally, Brian was critical to the success of our flourishing Northwest Film Center. In fact, it was Brian who led the negotiations of the merger of the Film Center in 1979.

Personally, I will miss Brian’s deep commitment and wise counsel. In fact, as an active member of our Chairman’s Council, Brian and I would speak often about the history of the Museum, his tenure as Chair and as a trustee, and his love of art, literature, film, and the Northwest. The Portland Art Museum has truly lost a central figure that shaped our history and defined our current success. Brian will be missed greatly.


Mark Rothko
Friday, February 17, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore. Mark Rothko, one of the leading American artists of the 20th century, began his life in art in Portland, Ore. Born Marcus Rothkowitz in Russia, he immigrated to Portland with his family as a child. He attended Lincoln High School and first studied art through the Museum Art School outreach, now the Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA), before going on to Yale, New York City, and beyond.

The Portland Art Museum was the host of Rothko’s first museum exhibition in 1933 and is pleased to present this original survey of Rothko’s work, the first Rothko painting retrospective to be staged in Portland.

The 45 works in the exhibition trace Rothko’s artistic path from the late 1920s until shortly before his death in 1970. Borrowed from the Rothko family, the National Gallery of Art, and private collectors, the exhibition presents Portland’s first comprehensive look at the artist’s development and the aesthetic issues that shaped his production over the course of his career.

“The exhibition is organized so that the visitor walks with Rothko as he evolves as an artist,” explained Chief Curator Bruce Guenther, the curator of the exhibition. “Most people are familiar with where he ended up with the classic color field paintings. This exhibition allows people to see the development that led to that work.”

The exhibition moves from his early figurative works influenced by Cezanne, Max Weber, and Milton Avery into the attenuated, isolated figures of his New York subway paintings, through an abstract surrealist phase to the emergence at the end of the 1940s of his mature abstract style of floating, saturated color and transcendent calm.

The exhibition celebrates an artist whose lyrical paintings have created a unique legacy for the world. A variety of public programs have been organized to enhance the experience of the exhibition. Portland’s own Third Angle Ensemble will perform Rothko Chapel: A Conversation of Words and Music featuring the music of Morton Feldman and John Cage. The artist’s son Christopher Rothko and exhibition curator Bruce Guenther will also lecture on the artist and his impact on painting into the present.

Portland Center Stage will present a production of Red by John Logan. An intense bio-drama inspired by the artist, Red earned critical laurels in its New York run last season. The New York Times described it as “a portrait of an angry and brilliant mind that asks you to feel the shape and texture of thoughts. ... As much as any stage work I can think of, Red captures the dynamic relationship between an artist and his creations.”

The exhibition is organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Bruce Guenther, chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art.

The Museum acknowledges the National Gallery of Art and the Rothko children, Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko, for their support of this effort to bring Rothko’s paintings to Portland, and wishes to recognize Arlene Schnitzer and the late Harold Schnitzer for their early advocacy and important support of the exhibition.

For information on visiting the exhibition and program tickets, go to portlandartmuseum.org or rothkopdx.org.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

JOHN FRAME: Three Fragments of a Lost Tale
Friday, February 17, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore.Art, music, poetry, and film come together in John Frame’s ambitious project The Tale of the Crippled Boy. The end goal of this ongoing project is a feature-length collection of animated and live film vignettes. Three Fragments of a Lost Tale presents his work on this project during the past five years, including installations of sculptures, stage sets, still photographs, music score, and animated film vignettes.

Since 2006, Frame, a California-based sculptor, has been working toward the creation of a stop-motion animated drama featuring an eclectic cast of fully articulated characters composed of found materials and meticulously carved wood. These figures build upon the distinctive, often theatrical, sculptures Frame has created throughout his career, which have been the subject of two retrospective exhibitions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Long Beach Museum of Art, Calif.

The inspiration for this project came to Frame in a semi-dream state in the middle of the night. He knew that the creative material he saw was significant and so he wrote notes and drew sketches of what he had envisioned and the following day he began bringing this world to life.

The exhibition includes the sculptures that have become the cast of characters in Frame’s evolving full-length film, as well as the film footage created thus far in this monumental project.

Originally organized by the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens; the exhibition is supported in part by McGeady Family Foundation.

Learn more and see part of the film at johnframesculpture.com.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Director's message on the passing of John Buchanan
Saturday, December 31, 2011

Dear members of the Board of Trustees, staff, and friends of the Portland Art Museum,

I am saddened to share the news of the passing of former Portland Art Museum Director John Buchanan.

Between 1994 and 2005, John led the Museum and is widely credited for reinvigorating the institution and placing the Museum on the international stage. Under his leadership, Museum membership tripled, the endowment grew, and attendance set records during a series of popular international exhibitions from Imperial Tombs of China (1996) to Stroganoff: The Palace and Collections of a Russian Noble Family (2000), and Hesse: A Princely Collection (2005).

John, together with his wife Lucy (who served as Director of Development), led three expansions of the Museum campus including the restoration of the Belluschi building, remodeling of the Hoffman Wing, and renovation of the historic Masonic Temple, now known as The Mark Building. Between 1994 and 2005, John and the Museum’s staff raised some $125 million for these major capital projects.

John was also responsible for growing the permanent collection. Working with the curatorial staff, he acquired important works including Van Dyck’s Portrait of Cardinal Domenico Rivarola (1623-1624), Cézanne’s Quai de Bercy-La Halle Aux Vins (1872), and the personal collection of the late critic Clement Greenberg, which included 155 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by major American abstract artists.

John’s leadership positioned the Museum physically and intellectually for future growth and new programs. His legacy of ambitious institutional expansion will be remembered and enjoyed by future generations of Museum visitors.

Personally, I owe much to John. Not only did he leave me with a quality institution to lead, but he also supported my candidacy to be his successor as the Director of the Portland Art Museum. I am extremely grateful and appreciative for his support and backing. Our thoughts are with Lucy in her time of loss. Details about a service will be forthcoming.

Sincerely,
Brian

Brian J. Ferriso
The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr, Director


MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS: January – April 2012
Thursday, December 15, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore.Press materials including images are available in the Museum’s online press office

 

Continuing

The Artist’s Touch, The Craftsman’s Hand
Three Centuries of Japanese Prints
through January 22, 2012
A celebration of the Museum’s world class collection of Japanese prints with works from the late 17th century to the present day. Many prints are extremely rare and will be on view for the first time.

Chris Burden: Ghost Ships
through January 22, 2012
Chris Burden: Ghost Ships is a trio of actual sailboats that have been reconfigured and programmed by the artist to periodically unfurl sails, pivot rudders, and simulate navigation. The sailboats will seem to sail through the Museum’s sculpture court, with the beauty and innocent pleasure of sailing juxtaposed against the mystery and sinister undertones of unmanned boats sailing to who knows where.

Masterworks | Portland
Titian’s La Bella
through January 29, 2012
A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to view this exceptional painting by the most celebrated artist of Renaissance Venice. From the Galleria Palantina in Florence, this classic portrait has never travelled to the United States before.

Martin Kippenberger
through February 19, 2012
A selection of paintings from the last decade of the artist’s life and 17 “Hotel Drawings,” intimate works created on hotel stationery gathered on his peripatetic travels from 1987 until 1997. The works present an irreverent and ferocious humor that accentuates the late artist’s acute sense of moral responsibility to humanity and the history of art.

Manuel Izquierdo
Paperworks
through March 4, 2012
A selection of drawings and prints from the artist’s estate will be exhibited. Izquierdo was one of the Northwest’s foremost sculptors and was also recognized as an exceptional woodblock printmaker and for his lesser-known pastel drawings. This exhibition presents a selection of drawings and prints, many of which have never been exhibited.


Opening

APEX: Robert Hanson
January 7 – April 29, 2012
Hanson’s drawings of seated female models communicate a sense of humanity that seems simultaneously contemporary and timeless. The exhibition features a selection of recent drawings.

MARK ROTHKO
February 18 – May 27, 2012
This exhibition of one of the leading artists of the 20th century features 45 works tracing Rothko’s artistic path from the late 1920s until shortly before his death in 1970. Rothko grew up in Portland and took his first art classes at the Museum Art School. A restrospective survey of Rothko’s work has never been staged in Portland, although his first museum exhibition was at the Portland Art Museum in 1933-34.

John Frame: Three Fragments of a Lost Tale
February 18 – May 27, 2012
Art, music, poetry, and film come together in John Frame’s ambitious project The Tale of the Crippled Boy. The end goal of this ongoing project is a feature-length collection of animated and live film vignettes. This exhibition presents his work on this project during the past five years, including installations of his handmade sculptures, stage sets, still photographs, music score, and animated film vignettes.

Joseph Beuys
February 18 – May 27, 2012
The second in the Museum’s yearlong series of major installation works by important postwar figures, Joseph Beuys features the monumental environmental work, Blitzschlag mit Lichtschein aug Hirsch (Lightning with Stag in its Glare), 1958-1985 along with selected multiples that extend the installation’s conceptual framework.

Cornerstones of a Great Civilization: Masterworks of Ancient Chinese Art
February 25 – November 11, 2012
After two years of scientific research and conservation, the Museum will reinstall its Money Tree along with three other works reflecting the ideals and values of formative periods in Chinese history.

Emerging: New Photography Acquisitions
March 10 – June 17, 2012
More than 500 photographs were added to the Museum’s extensive photography collection between 2009 and 2011. Emerging, a selection of more than 50 works, celebrates the diversity and breadth of these recent acquisitions and gifts.


Museum Hours
Monday: Closed
Tuesday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Wednesday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: noon to 5 p.m.

Museum Admission
Museum members: FREE
Children (17 and younger): FREE
Adults: $15
Seniors (55 and older): $12
Students (18 and older with ID): $12


Press materials including images are available in the Museum’s online press office

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Announces Curator of Graphic Arts
Monday, December 12, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore.Following a national search, the Portland Art Museum has appointed Mary Weaver Chapin, Ph.D., as curator of graphic arts. Chapin is currently the associate curator of prints and drawings at the Milwaukee Art Museum, Wisconsin. Chapin will be the third curator to head the Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Graphic Arts Center since its founding in 1993. She brings a rich background of academic scholarship and connoisseurship with wide ranging exhibition interests to the graphic arts program of the Museum.

Chapin is an experienced curator:, in her current position she has curated exhibitions including Framing a Decade: Acquisitions of Prints and Drawings, 2001-2011, Warrington Colescott: Cabaret, Comedy & Satire, and Catesby, Audubon, and the Discovery of a New World: Prints of the Flora and Fauna of America. Prior to her tenure in Milwaukee, Chapin trained at the Metropolitan Museum of Art before working at the Art Institute of Chicago, where she served as research assistant for Van Gogh and Gauguin: The Studio of the South and co-curated the award-winning exhibition Toulouse-Lautrec and Montmartre.

While at Milwaukee she was instrumental in the acquisition of important works including the donation of the complete printed oeuvre of Sam Francis, a rare Ludwig Meidner drawing from 1916, and Jacques Callot’s monumental etching, Siege of Breda (1628). She also actively grew the membership and activity of the Milwaukee’s Print Forum—a group similar to the Portland Art Museum’s graphic arts council, Friends of the Gilkey Center.

She was been widely published, including providing an essay in the Portland Art Museum’s publication of its important 2008 exhibition The Dancer: Degas, Forain, and Toulouse-Lautrec.

Chapin’s specialty is French 19th-century prints and drawings and German Expressionism, which are both strongly represented in the Museum’s collection. She received her Doctorate in art history and archeology and a Master’s Degree in art history from The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. Her dissertation was Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and the Café- Concert: Printmaking, Marketing, and Celebrity in Fin-de-Siècle Paris. She has a certificate in curatorial studies from New York University and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

“I am extremely pleased to welcome Mary to the distinguished curatorial team of the Portland Art Museum,” said Museum Director Brian Ferriso. “Her excellent training and years of experience combined with her passion for the visual arts will help the Museum build upon its strong graphic arts traditions while guiding it to new levels of excellence.”

Chapin will begin her new position in March and will be responsible for the Museum’s collection of more than 21,000 prints. She will evaluate and research objects, recommend acquisitions, and curate exhibitions and installations in the Museum’s Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Graphic Arts Center.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Museum Receives $2 million Gift to Endow Curator of Photography
Thursday, December 08, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — At its annual trustee dinner in December, the Portland Art Museum announced that it has received an anonymous gift of $2 million to endow the curator of photography position.

Since the donor wishes to remain anonymous, the position will be named in honor of American photographer Minor White who began his career in Portland. Julia Dolan, the current photography curator will be the first to use the title, Minor White Curator of Photography.

The gift means that the position will be supported in perpetuity and will not be impacted in times of recession or budget shortfalls. Part of the Museum’s strategic plan is to endow all of the curatorial positions. Before this gift, three curatorial departments were endowed: Asian art, Northwest art, and European art.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Unveils New Brand
Tuesday, September 13, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — This month the Portland Art Museum will unveil a new brand including a new visual identity that will be reflected in signage, advertising, and other materials.

The Museum recently completed a strategic planning process, identifying short-term and long-term goals for the institution and reaffirming the core values and mission of the Museum.

“Through this process we have reaffirmed the core values and mission of the Museum with a focus on what we want to do and how we want to do it,” said Ferriso. “With this fundamental understanding, we were ready to create a brand that reflects our past successes and our future goals.”

The Museum engaged Ziba Design, a renowned Portland-based firm that is a global leader in branding and product development. Through extensive interviews with Museum staff and trustees, residents, visitors, and members, Ziba learned that a number of people were not aware of the broad range of quality programs offered by the Museum.

Based on this research, a brand strategy was developed to reflect the essence of the institution. Ziba’s design team created a visual identity that clearly communicates the many facets of the Museum. The iconic anchor for the new mark is a large, bold, “P” that serves as a portal—a window—into the Museum. In its application, the collections, exhibitions, and programs will be framed.

“The Museum’s new brand is authentic and bold, paying homage to our past while also increasing the visibility of this vital 119-year-old institution, connecting it in an emphatic way with our 21st-century audiences,” said Ferriso.

Based on the new brand, the Museum’s communications will have a new look and voice, including changes to the members magazine, collateral materials, signage, and more.

The goal of the new brand is to bring together the Museum’s past with its future, connecting the institution with current and new audiences.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Offers Two Unique Opportunities to View The Allure of the Automobile
Wednesday, August 03, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore.The Allure of the Automobile at the Portland Art Museum has been drawing record crowds for a summer exhibition. The exhibition is the first time the Museum has allowed photography (without flash) in its special exhibition galleries and thousands of visitors have already shared their photographs online and through social media.

Special Session for Photographers
By popular demand, the Museum will offer a two-hour, limited access session exclusively for photographers. Tickets to the session will be limited to the first 40 photographers who purchase tickets. The limited number of people in the galleries will allow more space to set up shots of the exhibition’s sixteen amazing automobiles.

Members of the Museum’s staff will serve as tripod grips for those photographers wishing to use a tripod. Limited flash photography will be allowed.

The Allure of the Automobile Photo Session
Sunday, August 14, 10 a.m. to Noon
Photographers with tripod: $50
Photographers without tripod: $45

 

Hoods Up!
The Museum will offer a rare opportunity to view many of these extraordinary automobiles with their hoods up and engines exposed. Loan agreements require the Museum to limit the times that hoods may be open for viewing. Special tickets required for this event are limited and available online.

Hoods Up!
Sunday, August 21, 4 p.m. - 7 p.m.
$25 per person

 

Tickets to both events are limited and must be purchased in advance at www.portlandartmuseum.org.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Announces the Recipient of the Arlene Schnitzer Prize
Saturday, June 18, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — During the opening celebration of the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards, Museum Director Brian Ferriso announced Seattle artist John Grade as the recipient of the prestigious $10,000 Arlene Schnitzer Prize. The prize winner is chosen by Ferriso and the Museum’s curators and selected from the seven artists featured in the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards.

“John Grade’s rigorous conceptual framework articulated by beautiful and elaborate sculptural forms distinguished his art among the other objects. We are honored to have this deeply committed and skilled artist receive the second Arlene Schnitzer Prize,” said Ferriso.

A longtime Northwest resident, Grade has traveled extensively and his exposure to diverse cultures has deeply shaped his artistic vision. The land, and its propensity for change, has had a profound effect on his work. His often massive, site-related constructions involve the passage of time and performance while engaging natural elements and random change to ultimately complete his sculptural works.

The centerpiece of his installation in the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition is Fold (2011). With its intricate lacelike gridded form it mirrors patterns found in nature such as honey combs, metamorphic rock, and cross-sections of wasps nests. The sculpture also references the ancient grave sites and eroding villages Grade observed during his world travels shortly after his 1992 graduation from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Constructed of wood and resin that the artist pre-tested to determine its attraction to termites, the sculpture was designed to be transported to a termite infested area, and buried. It is one of a number of such works currently buried around the American west. Grade’s work sends an eerie reminder that even mankind’s most ambitious works may eventually succumb to nature’s forces.

Grade’s sculptures, documentary photographs, and videos have been exhibited in galleries and museums nationwide and in Europe including at L’H du Siège, Valenciennes and Foret Domaniale de Raismes, France; Fabrica, Brighton, United Kingdom; Boise Art Museum, Idaho; Bellevue Art Museum, Washington; Davidson Galleries, Seattle; and Cynthia Reeves Gallery, New York. He has earned numerous grants and awards including an Artist Trust Foundation fellowship, an Andy Warhol Foundation Award, and a Tiffany Foundation Award. In 2010, he won the prestigious Willard L. Metcalf Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York. This prize, like the Arlene Schnitzer Prize, is bestowed upon a young artist whose work exhibits “great promise.” He has received a number of grants during his career including grants from the Pollock Krasner Foundation (twice awarded); the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; City of Seattle, City Artists Program; 4Culture (awarded four times), King County Project Grant; and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation.

Grade will lead a tour of the installation and talk about his work on July 15 at 6 p.m. at the Museum. Information and tickets are available at portlandartmuseum.org.

 

About the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
(through September 11, 2011)
The second Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition showcases seven exceptional Northwest artists. The exhibition explores the work of Chris Antemann, John Buck, John Grade, Jerry Iverson, Susie Lee, Megan Murphy, and Michelle Ross.

Inaugurated in 2008, the exhibition and awards recognize outstanding contemporary art and artists from Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming. The exhibition recognizes both emerging and established artists and builds on the Museum’s commitment to the Northwest’s visual arts community. Artists are selected based on quality, innovation, relevance to community or global issues, continuity of vision, and dedication to studio practice.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

The Allure of the Automobile
Wednesday, June 08, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — This summer it will be hoods up and tops down at the Portland Art Museum. The Allure of the Automobile will bring 16 of the world’s most luxurious, rare, and brilliantly conceived automobiles to the galleries of the Museum. From the avant-garde 1937 Hispano-Suiza owned by French apéritif baron André Dubonnet to the ultra-cool convertible 1957 Jaguar XK-SS roadster once owned by Hollywood legend Steve McQueen, the exhibition spans the 1930s to the 1960s and showcases developments in automotive design and engineering.

The exhibition is the first to consider the stylistic development of cars in the context of prominent design movements such as Art Moderne and Postwar Modernity. Visitors will learn about the contrasts between European and American design and the significant changes in automotive styling and engineering before and after World War II.

Visitors will be able to consider the cars in a variety of ways: the artistry of the design, the marvel of the engineering, and the drama of the unique stories behind the cars.

Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see feats of design and engineering that are truly rolling works of art.

The exhibition experience is enhanced with an audio tour featuring Jay Leno. Download the free App on iTunes or rent an iPod Touch at the Museum. The exhibition is accompanied by a beautiful catalogue documenting each of the cars with stunning photography and essays.

Organized by the High Museum of Art and curated by Ken Gross, the exhibition has been reconceived for Portland.

 

FEATURED AUTOMOBILES

1930 Bentley Speed Six Gurney Nutting Coupe
Lent by Jolene and Bruce McCaw
Bellevue, Washington

1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster
Lent by Lee and Joan Herrington
Bow, New Hampshire

1933 Pierce-Arrow Silver Arrow
Lent by Don Williams and the Blackhawk Collection
Danville, California

1937 Hispano Suiza H-6C “Xenia” Coupe
Lent by Merle and Peter Mullin and the Peter Mullin
Automotive Museum Foundation
Beverly Hills, California

1931 Duesenberg SJ Derham Convertible Sedan
Lent by Tom and Susan Armstrong
Issaquah, Washington

1937 Bugatti Type 57S Atalante
Lent by William E. (Chip) Connor II
Deepwater Bay, Hong Kong

1937 Talbot-Lago T150-C-SS “Teardrop” Coupe
Lent by Arturo and Deborah Keller
Petaluma, California

1953 Porsche 550, Prototype
Lent by Miles Collier and the Collier Collection
Naples, Florida

1938 Alfa Romeo 8C2900B Touring Berlinetta
Lent by Jan and Mary Shirley
Bellevue, Washington

1954 Plymouth Explorer Sports Coupe
Lent by Margie Petersen and the
Petersen Automotive Museum
Los Angeles, California

1948 Tucker Model 48 Torpedo
Lent by The LeMay Family Collection,
Compliments of LeMay—America’s Car Museum
Tacoma, Washington

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR Roadster
Lent by the Mercedes-Benz Museum
Stuttgart, Germany

1957 Jaguar XK-SS Roadster
Lent by Margie Petersen and the
Petersen Automotive Museum
Los Angeles, California

1961 Ferrari 250 GT Comp./61 Short-wheelbase Berlinetta
Lent by Bruce and Raylene Meyer
Beverly Hills, California

1959 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray Prototype
Lent by the General Motors Heritage Center
Warren, Michigan

1961 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato Coupe
Lent by David and Ginny Sydorick
Beverly Hills, California

 

EXHIBITION ADMISSION:
Tickets will be timed for entry.

  • Adults $15
  • Seniors (55+) & Students (18+ with I.D.) $12
  • Adult Groups (12 or more) $12
  • Museum Members FREE
  • Children (ages 17 and younger) FREE

Tickets are available at the Museum box office or at portlandartmuseum.org.

To download high resolution images and news releases from the Portland Art Museum, visit the Press Office section of our website: http://www.portlandartmuseum.org/about/news/

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
Wednesday, June 08, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — The second Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition showcases seven exceptional Northwest artists. The exhibition explores the work of Chris Antemann, John Buck, John Grade, Jerry Iverson, Susie Lee, Megan Murphy, and Michelle Ross, and is accompanied by a catalogue and exhibition-related programs. The artists’ work ranges from delicate, figurative porcelain vignettes to heroic-scale sculpture, and from film and video installations to glass and mixed-media painting. At the exhibition’s opening celebration, one artist will be awarded the $10,000 Arlene Schnitzer Prize. The prize winner will be selected by the Museum’s curators and Director Brian Ferriso.

Inaugurated in 2008 to recognize outstanding contemporary art and artists from Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming, this ambitious program was developed to highlight both emerging and established artists. The exhibition builds on the Museum’s commitment to the Northwest’s visual arts community. A wide range of regional arts professionals nominated artists on the basis of quality, innovation, relevance to community or global issues, continuity of vision, and dedication to studio practice.

The exhibition will be on view in the Julie Neupert Stott Gallery and the Jackie and Jerry Inskeep Gallery. Organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art. Funded in part by The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowment for Northwest Art, Mary C. and Gregory K. Hinckley, The Intermec Foundation, Rose E. Tucker Charitable Trust, John and Joan Shipley, Tonkon Torp LLP, The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Northwest Art Council of the Portland Art Museum. Support for Northwest Art has also been provided by the Henry Luce Foundation’s American Art Renewal Fund.

 

RELATED EVENTS:

Opening Celebration
SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 6 P.M.
View the exhibition and celebrate the Contemporary Northwest Art Award recipients and the announcement of the Arlene Schnitzer Prize, at a reception in the Fred and Suzanne Fields Ballroom.

$15 members; $20 non-members; reservations required. Tickets available online and on site.

Northwest Awards & Biennials: A Panel Discussion
SUNDAY JULY 17, 2 P.M.
Whitsell Auditorium
Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson moderates a lively discussion about Northwest art and how best to recognize the art and artists of the region. Panel includes Rock Hushka, chief curator at the Tacoma Art Museum and Bruce Guenther, chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art, Portland Art Museum.

$5 members; $12 non-members. Seating is limited. Advance tickets available online and on site.

Series: Artist Talks & Tours
JUNE 16, JULY 8, JULY 15, AND JULY 226 P.M. LECTURE; 6:45 TOUR
Miller Gallery & Exhibition Galleries
Join Contemporary Northwest Art Award artists as they talk about their work and lead tours of the exhibition.

  • JUNE 16: CHRIS ANTEMANN
  • JULY 8: SUSIE LEE AND MICHELLE ROSS
  • JULY 15: MEGAN MURPHY AND JOHN GRADE
  • JULY 22: JOHN BUCK AND JERRY IVERSON

$5 members; $12 non-members. Space is limited to the first 45 ticket holders. Advance tickets available online and on site.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Chris Antemann
JOSEPH, OREGON
Inspired by 18th-century porcelain figurines, Antemann’s work examines and parodies traditional gender roles. Her ceramics espouse a Rococo decadence that is oddly contemporary and feminist. She earned her MFA in ceramics from the University of Minnesota and her BFA in ceramics and painting from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She has exhibited extensively in the United States and China. She is the 2010 First Place Winner of the Virginia A. Groot Grant.

John Buck
BOZEMAN, MONTANA
Well known for his politically astute sculpture and large-scale woodblock prints, Buck received his BFA from Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA from the University of California, Davis. Museums across the country, including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Chicago Art Institute, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum have works by Buck in their collections. The subject of numerous exhibitions, Buck has received a National Endowment for the Arts Individual Artist Award.

John Grade
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
A long time Northwest resident, Grade has traveled extensively and his exposure to diverse cultures has deeply shaped his artistic vision. The land, and its propensity for change, has had a profound effect on his work. His massive sculptures have been exhibited in galleries and museums nationwide and in Europe. He has earned numerous grants and awards including an Artist Trust Foundation fellowship, an Andy Warhol Foundation Award, and a Tiffany Foundation Award. He received his BFA from the Pratt Institute in New York.

Jerry Iverson
BIG TIMBER, MONTANA
Iverson lives and makes his art in a rehabilitated log cabin and barn. The vast, stark strength of the landscape surrounding his ranch contrasts with his concern over tumultuous world affairs and finds metaphorical representation in his explosive compositions. His multi-media, sumi ink paintings have been in numerous exhibitions including two appearances in the Tacoma Art Museum’s Biennial. Iverson received his BA in philosophy from St. Olaf College in Minnesota.

Susie Lee
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Lee’s time-based work uses video and sound to engage the viewer in a mental dialogue concerning life’s transitory nature. She addresses issues of permanence and loss by creating compelling physical objects. Her work integrates her background in molecular science with her studio practice. She holds a BS degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. She received her MFA from the University of Washington and has exhibited in museums and galleries in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

Megan Murphy
HAILEY, IDAHO
Murphy’s paintings can be found in public collections including the Yale Art Museum Collection, Boise Art Museum, and the Microsoft Collection. Her concern for our fragile natural environment is literally reflected in the media she chooses to employ. Combining photographs with mirror and layers of paint and text that she repeatedly applies and rubs away, Murphy creates a surface that is partially reflective, opaque, and transparent. Her work has been exhibited across the country. Murphy holds a BFA from Marylhurst University and an MA in theology from Mt. Angel Abbey, Saint Benedict, Ore.

Michelle Ross
PORTLAND, OREGON
Ross holds an MFA degree from Washington State University and a BFA from the Pacific Northwest College of Art. Her abstract painting vacillates between a desire for restraint and destruction. Her work has been exhibited throughout the region. Ross teaches at Portland’s Oregon College of Art and Craft and has received numerous awards including an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Oregon Arts Commission. She has held residencies at the American Academy in Rome, New Mexico State University, and the Vermont Studio Center.

 

THE FINALISTS:

Holly Andres, Chris Antemann, John Buck, Jaq Chartier, G.Lewis Clevenger, James Coupe, Tannaz Farsi, Anna Fidler, Justin Gibbens, Charles Gill, John Grade, Robert Hanson, Sean Healy, Jerry Iverson, Arnold Kemp, Scott Kolbo, Cynthia Lahti, Isaac Layman, Lead Pencil Studio: Annie Han & Daniel Mihalyo, Susie Lee, Megan Murphy, Jenene Nagy, Ryan Pierce, Michelle Ross, Heidi Schwegler, Susan Seubert, Eric Stotik, Sherrie Wolf

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Launches Object Stories
Friday, March 04, 2011

"There is no separation between objects and subjects."
—Daniel Miller, Professor of Anthropology, University College, London

PORTLAND, Ore. — Drawing from material culture, thing theory, anthropology, museum education, and traditions of storytelling, Object Stories, the Portland Art Museum's new installation, is an open-ended exploration of the relationship between people and things, the Museum and the community, and the subjective and objective.

Opening on March 5, Object Stories invites people and their objects into the Museum to tell stories about things that matter to them—whether a postcard, military medal, or childhood toy. These objects and stories will be captured and published to an onsite and online digital archive, where they will comingle with recorded personal stories about Museum objects. An installation of Museum objects will accompany the digital archive.

By putting ordinary things and the public at the center of its inquiry, and calling attention to the things we overlook in our lives, Object Stories ruminates on the ways objects make us as fully as we make objects, and the myriad ways objects speak to and shape who we are—our ideas, emotions, values, relationships, and aesthetics. Object Stories offers new possibilities to shift the relationship people make with museums, reshaping the institution as an organic, ever-growing repository made collectively by us of our stories and objects, mundane and exalted, personal and subjective.

See stories and learn more about how to tell your object story: objectstories.org.

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

Opening Celebration
Celebrate the public opening of Object Stories with screenings, storytelling, and readings by the initiative's initial community partners Northwest Film Center, Miracle Theater Group, and Write Around Portland on Saturday March 12, 2 p.m.

Objectivity
A funny, fast-paced night of spirited storytelling and fibbing around objects with Portland celebrities and "mystery guests." Moderated by novelist and humorist Marc Acito. Will the real object please stand up!
Friday April 22, 7 p.m.

 

Generously funded by a Museum and Community Connections grant from the Metlife Foundation, Object Stories seeks to actively engage the broad public, and diversify Museum audiences. The initiative’s main components are a video booth and gallery, storytelling workshops with Write Around Portland, videos created with Miracle Theatre Group, and an opening celebration in which workshop participants and the public are invited to come together to celebrate the power of storytelling and the opening of the public gallery and booth.

Object Stories is a collaboration between the Museum and the Northwest Film Center; initial programming was in cooperation with Write Around Portland and the Miracle Theatre Group; design and fabrication provided by Ziba Design, Fashionbuddha, and EyeLevel. The project is generously supported by the Metlife Foundation, the Lehman Foundation, and the Kress Foundation.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Announces Recipients of Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
Friday, February 18, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — Today the Portland Art Museum announced the recipients of the 2011 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards:

  • Chris Antemann – Joseph, OR
  • John Buck – Bozeman, MT
  • John Grade – Seattle, WA
  • Jerry Iverson – Big Timber, MT
  • Susie Lee – Seattle, WA
  • Megan Murphy – Ketchum, ID
  • Michelle Ross – Portland, OR

Their work ranges from delicate, figurative porcelain vignettes to heroic scale sculpture, and from film and video installations to glass and mixed-media painting.

“The Portland Art Museum’s commitment to collecting and exhibiting the art of the region dates to our founding nearly 120 years ago,” said Museum Executive Director Brian Ferriso. “It, therefore, gives the Museum great pleasure to reaffirm that dedication with the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards, which is part of a larger evolving strategy of collecting, presenting, and educating our audiences about contemporary Northwest art and artists.”

Recent and new work by these seven artists will be featured in the exhibition opening June 11 which will be accompanied by a full-color catalogue and Museum programming. Each award recipient will receive an honorarium. During the exhibition’s opening celebration, one artist will be awarded the Arlene Schnitzer Prize, a $10,000 cash award named in honor of philanthropist, patron, and life trustee Arlene Schnitzer. The prize winner will be selected by the Museum’s curators and Ferriso.

Inaugurated in 2008, the exhibition celebrates outstanding contemporary art and artists from Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming. Arts professionals, including educators, curators, and critics, in the five states were invited to nominate artists on the basis of quality, innovation, relevance to community or global issues, continuity of vision, and dedication to studio practice. Nearly 300 artists were nominated and 241 chose to submit application materials. Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art reviewed the materials, selected 28 finalists, and conducted studio visits before choosing the seven award recipients.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Riches of a City: Portland Collects
Thursday, February 03, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — Organized by the Portland Art Museum, the exhibition Riches of a City: Portland Collects celebrates arts patronage in Portland and the influence these collections have on the Museum. Opening on February 5, the exhibition features more than 230 objects from some 80 private collections in the city. The exhibition title references a quote from C.E.S. Wood, a founder of the Museum and arts patron: “Good citizens are the riches of a city.”

For nearly a year, four of the Museum’s curators have been exploring local collections of photography, prints, drawings, silver, Asian art, European art, and modern and contemporary art, uncovering exceptional objects including works by Degas, Picasso, Lautrec, Miro, and Warhol.

The curators visited with more than 150 collectors and considered hundreds of objects. The works in the exhibition reveal a variety of collecting interests and passions and give the public a rare glimpse behind closed doors. The diversity of objects also reflects the diversity of collectors from long-time residents to new citizens and from individuals with large collections to some with a handful of objects.

Some of the objects in the exhibition have been shown at the Portland Art Museum or other institutions in the past but most will be exhibited publicly for the first time.

“This exhibition provides an excellent opportunity for the Portland Art Museum to fulfill one of its core responsibilities, which is to place great works of art within the public realm either through temporary exhibition or by adding to the collection in perpetuity,” said Brian Ferriso, the Museum’s director.

Art collectors can have a strong influence on a museum’s permanent collection, and the Portland Art Museum is not an exception. More than 80 percent of the Museum’s permanent collection has come from generous gifts of art from collectors. From Portland’s earliest years, citizens have collected the art of their day from Egyptian scarabs and Ethiopian crosses, Japanese prints and Chinese ceramics, English portraits and French Barbizon School paintings. These collectors brought these exotic works back from their travels to Portland. Many of these private collectors would be the founding members of the Museum and lend their artworks to the early exhibitions of the Portland Art Association. In its 117 year history, the Museum has organized 20 exhibitions highlighting private collections in the region.

Riches of a City is the most ambitious of these exhibitions historically, not only with the number of objects but also the diversity of mediums on display. The exhibition installation is organized almost like a museum within a museum. Bright yellow end walls key the visitor that they are entering different sections where objects share a common subject, technique, or theme. This organization allows visitors to consider ancient Asian art in relationship to contemporary prints or works of photography through multiple generations, or artists who were influenced by other artists. For example, the Schnitzer Sculpture Court presents a three generation look at mid-century American art through paintings and sculpture.

The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated, full-color 12 page softbound catalogue which celebrates Portland’s community of collectors, documents every object, and highlights singular objects. Riches of a City is organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Bruce Guenther, chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art; Maribeth Graybill, Ph.D, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Asian Art; Julia Dolan, Ph.D., curator of photography; and Annette Dixon, Ph.D., curator of prints and drawings.

 

EXHIBITION OVERVIEW:

WHEN: February 4 – May 22, 2011

WHERE: The Jackie & Jerry Inskeep Gallery, the Julie Neupert Stott Gallery, and the Maribeth Wilson Collins Gallery

ORGANIZER: Organized by the Portland Art Museum

 

CURATORS:
Bruce Guenther, chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art
Maribeth Graybill, Ph.D., The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Asian Art
Julia Dolan, Ph.D., curator of photography
Annette Dixon, Ph.D., curator of prints and drawings

 

SPONSORS:
The Private Client Reserve of U.S. Bank, Mary Clark, Maribeth W. Collins Endowment Fund, Judy C. and Martin Kelley Endowment Fund, Laura S. Meier, The Mark Family, Andrée Stevens, Mr. and Mrs. William, A. Whitsell, Nani S. Warren, The Boeing Company, Brooks and Dorothy Cofield, Prudence Miller, Travers Hill Polak and  The Walter Clay Hill and Family Foundation, Dr. Alton and Celia Wiebe. Jim and Susan Winkler, The Acorn Fund of OCF Exhibition Series Sponsors: The James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, Ziba Design, PLANAR, The Collins Foundation, Mary C. Becker, Nancie S. McGraw, Pat and Trudy Ritz, Eric and Ronna Hoffman Fund of OCF, Maribeth Collins Exhibition Endowment Fund, Arlene and Harold Schnitzer, Julie and Peter Stott, Ray Hickey Foundation, PGE Foundation, Larry and Jane Viehl, NW Natural, Vibrant Table Catering & Events, Anonymous Media Sponsors: KGW NewsChannel 8, Kink.FM, The Oregonian

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Popular Artist Talks Series Continues at the Portland Art Museum
Wednesday, February 02, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — The second Thursday of each month offers the opportunity to explore objects in the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection through the inspired lens of a local artist. Participants depart at 6 p.m. from the Hoffman Lobby. Talks are followed by a lively happy hour discussion with the artist, featuring complimentary food and wine, until 8 p.m.

On February 10, artist Kristan Kennedy will discuss Renoir’s sculpture Venus Victorious. The bronze sculpture is on view in the Museum’s Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art.

Kennedy selected this work because of the show she curated at PNCA and her own work. She’ll discuss the history of the object and its initial controversy. According to Kennedy, her talk will consider the ambivalence/reverence of “classical” sculpture and representations of the body and her own interest in the repetitive nature of art making and the obsession with certain motifs, such as nudes.

Kennedy is the Visual Art Curator for the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA). Her work was included in both the 1999 and 2006 Oregon Biennial exhibitions at the Museum. She is represented by Elizabeth Leach Gallery.

$5 members, $12 non-members. Space is limited to the first 45 ticket holders. Advance tickets available online and on-site.

 

UPCOMING ARTIST TALKS

Namita Wiggers
MARCH 10
Namita Wiggers is the curator at Museum of Contemporary Craft in partnership with Pacific Northwest College of Art. A former studio art jeweler, she was an instructor at Columbia College, Chicago, a senior researcher at e-Lab, and coordinator of public programs at Blaffer Gallery at University of Houston.

Jelly Helm
APRIL 14
Jelly Helm is principal of Jelly Helm Studio, a small creative studio in Old Town/Chinatown that produces art projects, community events, and storytelling for clients. He was formerly executive creative director at Wieden+Kennedy and founder/director of W+K 12, Wieden+Kennedy’s experimental in-house school.

Brian Libby
MAY 12
Brian Libby is a Portland writer, photographer, and filmmaker. Libby’s award-winning short films have screened at the Northwest Film & Video Festival, Portland International Film Festival, and London’s Exploding Cinema. Libby’s photographs have been published in a variety of publications and were exhibited in a critically acclaimed 2003 show at the American Institute of Architects.

Click here to watch video selections from previous Artist Talks.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum Announces Finalists for the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
Monday, January 24, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — Today, the Portland Art Museum announced the finalists for the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards, an awards exhibition celebrating contemporary art created in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. The finalists are:

Holly Andres John Grade Megan Murphy 
Chris Antemann Robert Hanson Jenene Nagy
John Buck Sean Healy Ryan Pierce
Jaq Chartier Jerry Iverson Michelle Ross
Glenn L. Clevenger Arnold Kemp Heidi Schwegler
James Coupe Scott Kolbo Susan Seubert
Tannaz Farsi Cynthia Lahti Eric Stotik
Anna Fidler Isaac Layman Sherrie Wolf
Justin Gibbons Lead Pencil Studio –
Annie Han & Daniel Mihalyo
 
Charles Gill Susie Lee  

 

About the Finalists
There are 29 artists, but two artists work collaboratively. There are 14 women and 15 men with ages ranging from their 20s to over 70. Two are from Idaho, two are from Montana, 16 are from Oregon, and eight are from Washington.

 

The Selection Process
Regional arts professionals, including curators, scholars, dealers, writers, artists, and critics were invited to nominate visual artists based on the quality of their work, innovation, skill, continuity of vision, commitment to their practice, and level of development in their career. The Museum received 296 nominations and invited the nominated artists to submit application materials. Of the nominated artists, 241 submitted materials for consideration.

Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, the Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art, reviewed the nominees’ materials and selected the finalists. She will continue reviewing the artists’ work through studio visits during the next several weeks. She will eventually select five to seven artists to be recognized with the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards. These artists will be featured in the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition opening June 11.

 

About the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards
The exhibition and awards program will honor artistic merit and potential while providing an in-depth and scholarly presentation of work of artists working in the Northwest. The award recipients will be honored with an exhibition, a full-color catalogue, exhibition-related programming, and a modest cash award. One of the award recipients will be further recognized with the Arlene Schnitzer Prize in the amount of $10,000. The finalists announced today will be recognized in the catalogue.

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Rare Opportunity to Explore French Impressionist Monet at the Portland Art Museum
Tuesday, January 04, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore. — For a limited time—now through January 31—visitors to the Portland Art Museum will have a unique opportunity to view four major canvases by French Impressionist Claude Monet (1840–1926). The four paintings are hung in close proximity in the Museum’s Impressionist galleries and offer insight into the artist’s practice over three decades. Claude Monet’s Waterlilies (1914-15) is arguably the centerpiece of the Museum’s permanent collection and one of the most popular for visitors and members. Thanks to a loan from a private collection, visitors will also see Monet’s companion painting, Nymphéas (1914-1917), an oil painting of the same group of waterlilies in his beloved pond and garden at his home in Giverny, France. The paintings are installed near the Museum’s two other Monet paintings, River at Lavacourt (1879) and Le Chateau d’Antibes (c. 1888), in the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art

“The chance to study two masterworks conceived and executed with the same palette in the same place, perhaps a few days apart is a unique opportunity,” said Bruce Guenther, chief curator. The canvases open up Monet’s investigations of light and color and illustrate the potential for such different resulting energies in the works.”

While the companion Nymphéas, will remain on view until April 31, the Museum’s Waterlilies will be part of a major exhibition at the Wadsworth Antheneum in Connecticut beginning in February and running through June 12. Because of its popularity, the Museum has only loaned the painting some seven times in the past fifty years.

Monet’s Water Lilies: an Artist’s Obsession will be an excellent scholarly look at Monet’s late period organized by one of our FRAME (French Regional American Museum Exchange) partners who have been helpful in past projects of the Museum including The Dancer and La Volupté de goût,” said Museum Director Brian Ferriso.

During his lifetime, Monet painted some 300 oil paintings depicting his water garden and Japanese bridge at his home in Giverny and they were the main focus of his practice during the last years of his life. He once observed, “It took me time to understand my waterlilies. I had planted them for the pleasure of it; I grew them without ever thinking of painting them.”

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Contact: Beth Heinrich
  503-276-4370 (O)
  beth.heinrich@pam.org

Portland Art Museum

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